Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Q. We have an employee who has filed several sexual harassment complaints. But when we investigate, they turn out to be false. Can we do something about her? —J.P., Oklahoma

If you think that you can forget about a discrimination dispute just because the employee doesn't file an EEOC complaint within the allotted time, you may be in for a surprise. As a new court ruling shows, the EEOC can sue your organization years, or even decades, after the alleged discrimination took place ...

Although it may be tempting to let unproven employees "try out" a promotion to see if they'll work out, be careful of the hidden legal risks. If you treat the acting supervisor differently than other promoted employees, you could end up on the wrong end of a discrimination suit ...

The federal job anti-discrimination law (Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act) applies to employers with 15 or more employees. So, if you have fewer than 15 workers, you may think you're automatically immune from such suits. Not so fast, says a new Supreme Court ruling ...

The EEOC just revamped its guidance on racial and color discrimination in the workplace. These changes signal increased race-bias enforcement, plus more EEOC attention to "subtle" discrimination ...

Giving employees nicknames may seem like harmless fun. But realize that giving the wrong nickname can lead to legal trouble. How? If a nickname singles out an employee in a legally protected category, a court may say the nickname contributes to creating discrimination or an illegal “hostile environment.” That may seem obvious in such cases […]

In a recent EEOC race discrimination settlement, Cracker Barrel agreed to pay more than $2 million to 51 current and former employees because of supervisors' actions at three of its Illinois restaurants ...

If an employee claims she was sexually harassed but the evidence shows that she gave as good as she got, you have a good defense in hand. As a new ruling shows, employees' sexual statements can be used against them when they sue for sexual harassment ...

The EEOC recently sent a powerful signal about its enforcement priorities when it published newly revised employer guidance on workplace race and color discrimination. The message: Employee complaints of race bias or color bias will be pushed to the top of the EEOC's inbox ...

When a sexual harassment accusation arises, employers often move into crisis mode. But don't try to push the problem off your plate by quickly jettisoning the employee via a kangaroo court ...