Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Two recent court decisions—one by the U.S. Supreme Court and another by  a Georgia court—mean employers may soon see a spike in lawsuits brought by employees rushing to meet a 180-day deadline for filing discrimination claims.

The EEOC last month filed a lawsuit against the owner of the Crazy Horse Steak House & Saloon in New Oxford for sexually harassing female employees ...

That’s the lesson for University of Georgia women’s golf coach Todd McCorkle, who resigned in the wake of complaints from several players that he frequently made inappropriate sexual jokes and comments ...

If Senator Jim Ferlo (D-Allegheny) and 19 other state senators get their way, employers will have another anti-discrimination law to worry about. Ferlo has reintroduced legislation that would ban gay discrimination in employment, housing and credit ...

Q. I know that my company can be sued by my current and former employees for its employment actions. Do I, as an HR professional, have personal liability for my participation in employment decisions?

Some new mothers returning to work after giving birth request time off during the workday to express and store breast milk. Some states have passed specific laws protecting nursing women from harassment and discrimination ...

Employees who think a supervisor is treating them unfairly and suspect discrimination often will look for an escape. One tactic is to ask for a transfer to another department or location. Don’t think that you’re required to acquiesce ...

Q. We have a position open in our sales department for someone who will be planning and executing company-sponsored events, most of which would take place outside normal 9-to-5 working hours. Is there a way we can ask about the applicants’ family situations and make it clear that missing these events because of family obligations would not be tolerated?

It certainly shouldn’t be a routine practice, but you can require employees to undergo “fitness for duty” examinations. The trick is knowing exactly when and why such an exam is legal—or not ...

Nothing rankles employers more than being accused of discrimination when the statistics show that their workplace is a model of diversity and equal opportunity. You can turn those statistics in your favor ...