Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

If you don’t ensure that clearly qualified, post age-40 employees aren’t seriously considered for promotions, you could be risking an expensive lawsuit under the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act ...

Employee benefits involve more than just health care and life insurance. Less-noticeable perks—like prime office locations and trips to out-of-town conferences—can also count, and they can become the grounds for discrimination …

A police officer recently won a harassment lawsuit against the city of Margate for the city’s response when the U.S. Army Reserve called him to active duty ...

You have the right to prohibit employees from engaging in other gainful employment while at work. But can you (or should you) ban off-the-clock moonlighting? And when should you discipline employees for moonlighting? ...

After last year’s blockbuster U.S. Supreme Court decision that made it easier for employees to sue for workplace retaliation (Burlington Northern v. White), courts have been trying to figure out how to apply that ruling in real-life situations ...

Employers should never look the other way if they know about a supervisor’s harassing behavior. Investigate every complaint and promptly discipline harassers ...

Sometimes, all the candidates for a promotion are equally qualified, making the selection difficult. It becomes a legally prickly issue when one or more of the candidates is in a protected category (race, age, gender, etc.). But you don’t have to resort to drawing straws ...

A New York jury has awarded the former editor-in-chief of The Source, a hip-hop magazine, $15.5 million in damages from her sex discrimination lawsuit ...

Just because a doctor sets a physical restriction on an employee, that doesn’t mean the employee is “disabled” and entitled to special ADA accommodations ...

Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 has become an increasingly common route for African-Americans to bring to federal court a variety of discrimination claims not covered by Title VII. But claims of national-origin discrimination aren’t allowed under Section 1981...