Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Flushing Manor Geriatric Center Inc. in Queens will pay $900,000 to 29 Haitian and Jamaican employees for race discrimination and retaliation ...

Employers use a wide variety of tests to determine whether job applicants can perform the jobs they seek. The tests usually measure the candidates’ knowledge, skills and abilities. But if tests cover anything other than the employee’s ability to perform the job’s essential functions, employers could find themselves defending the tests in court ...

Warn managers and supervisors: It’s dangerous to demand that employees speak English at work! The EEOC sees restrictive English-only policies as possible national origin discrimination. What’s more, the National Labor Relations Board views such policies as possible unfair labor practices if the restriction limits the ability of employees to discuss work conditions ...

Good news for government employers: Employees who sue for discrimination under both the federal Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Florida Civil Rights Act don’t get to collect double damages ...

A Plant City woman has filed suit against 5-D Tropical, a Tampa fish farmer and importer, for AIDS discrimination ...

The City of Port St. Lucie will reinstate a demoted meter reader and pay her $60,000 to settle a race discrimination and USERRA lawsuit ...

If you don’t have a sexual harassment policy (or if no one pays attention to the one you have), watch out! You’ll have to pay compensatory damages if an employee can prove he or she was sexually harassed—and you also could pay punitive damages ...

Have your employees lost a sense of appropriate workplace attire? If so, remember that you can enforce a reasonable dress code. Just stay clear of banning religious dress that doesn’t pose a safety hazard—that might amount to religious discrimination. On the other hand, you don’t have to allow the same employee to sport the religious (and other) symbols of multiple faiths ...

The EEOC just issued guidelines stating that one’s status as a family member can’t be considered in employment decisions. The agency says the guidelines address “family-responsibility discrimination.” They draw on earlier theories about so-called “gender-plus” discrimination ...

Jobs evolve and often become more complex, so it makes sense to revisit job requirements when someone quits, retires or is promoted. There’s no better time to re-evaluate positions to make sure the next job candidates will have the skills, training and experience necessary to succeed. But if you don’t document the changes carefully, you may find yourself facing a lawsuit ...