Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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If, like many employers, you would rather avoid litigation by relying instead on arbitration to settle workplace disputes, you probably know that employees still may take their claims to the EEOC. That’s because the agency claims an interest in knowing whether employers are following the nation’s anti-discrimination laws. But it’s perfectly legal to force an employee into arbitration over those same claims ...

It may be a busy, hectic and crazy workplace, but that doesn’t excuse supervisors and managers from providing updated and accurate job descriptions and documenting job performances. Workplaces that neglect those essential duties face huge lawsuit risks ...

Although there is no blanket rule against transferring someone who has been involved in a romantic relationship with a co-worker, make sure the transfer benefits the transferred party and can’t be viewed as punishment. Otherwise, the transferred employee may claim retaliation ...

A woman who worked in DaimlerChrysler’s Toledo machining plant lost her sexual harassment case against the company partly because of a sound employment agreement—and partly because the company responded appropriately to her complaint ...

A court has awarded $4.4 million to a Seattle woman who worked at a Goodyear store and endured harassment—and eventual retaliation—because she is gay ...

The Ohio Supreme Court has narrowed the scope of the public-policy wrongful discharge claim in Ohio. In Leininger v. Pioneer Nat’l Latex, the Ohio Supreme Court said employees couldn’t claim wrongful discharge after being fired for speaking out on alleged age discrimination. Here’s what the decision means ...

No employer is immune from employee lawsuits. But there is a lot you can do to lessen the impact of lawsuits that do occur—before they cost huge expenditures of time, effort and money. One of the best ways to ensure the quick dismissal of frivolous claims is to have information at your fingertips, especially disciplinary data ...

Employees who retire to avoid facing internal disciplinary charges can’t turn around and claim they were constructively discharged. That’s why employers might want to consider offering retirement in such cases as an option in lieu of discipline ...

Technically, favoring friends and family members for jobs and giving them plum assignments isn’t illegal. But if nepotism results in an all or mostly white work force, applicants or employees from other protected categories (e.g., race, gender, national origin) can still sue, claiming illegal discrimination ...

If a victim of alleged sexual harassment waits months—or even a year or more—before complaining, you may wonder how serious her claim is. Don’t let your doubts affect how you handle the case. In fact, the best way to protect your organization is to act quickly on all harassment complaints, no matter how improbable, minor or tardy they may seem ...