Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

If it's been awhile since the last overhaul of your employee handbook, you may be courting danger. Establish a regular revision schedule for your handbook, updating it once a year or whenever significant statutory changes occur ...

Employers often bend over backward to give employees second chances. But when second chances turn into third and fourth chances, you'll  probably lose your patience and send the employee packing. Some employers, however, wrongly believe that they must cite a particularly serious behavior or performance problem as the last straw before termination. As a new ruling shows, that's simply not true ...

It's summertime, and corporate thoughts turn to company picnics and outdoor morale-boosting efforts. One word of caution: If your team-building exercises go beyond three-legged sack races and into the realm of reality TV, you could be headed for a lawsuit ...

Process every employee complaint without commenting on its merits or on the potential consequences of making the complaint. Remind managers to do the same. Never make snide comments ...

If an employee has attendance problems due to health issues, those absences may not be covered by the ADA even if they're covered by the FMLA. That's especially true if regular attendance is an essential job function ...

Lawmakers in Massachusetts are debating legislation that would make it the second state (after Michigan) to prohibit job discrimination based on a person’s height or weight. Passage of the bill in Massachusetts could spark interest in such laws in other states.

When faced with a multipage employment contract, some job candidates and employees may be tempted to skip a careful reading before they sign on the dotted line. But state courts won't excuse employees who claim that they didn't understand the employment terms because they never read them ...

Managers in every U.S. organization got a wake-up call from the U.S. Supreme Court this summer about the legal risk of retaliating against employees who voice complaints about discrimination or other on-the-job wrongdoing. In a landmark ruling, the Supreme Court established a broad national definition of what management actions would be considered illegal “retaliation” under [...]

When the U.S. Supreme Court began its new term, one of its first moves was to reject a case that could have created new responsibilities for employers in investigating sexual harassment ...

Just because employees are young doesn't mean they don't know their rights to a harassment-free workplace. The media firestorm involving Rep. Mark Foley's improper e-mails to teen pages in Congress raised awareness among workers, parents and employers about harassment of teen workers ...