Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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If you’re honest when law enforcement officials ask for information about a potential crime involving an employee, the worker can’t sue for false arrest, even if he’s not formally charged or eventually is found not guilty.

The EEOC has taken up the case of a man who worked as a translator for Haitian workers at a Lumber Bridge chicken farm. The man allegedly complained that Haitian workers at Mountaire Farms were treated more harshly than other employees. He claims that he made one complaint too many and was fired for it.

HR Law 101: Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, employers with 20 or more workers can’t engage in personnel practices that discriminate against individuals age 40 and older. Most age discrimination cases grow out of wrongful discharge and mandatory retirement policies, but they can involve any adverse change in working conditions ...

Employees who complain about dis­­crimination can sue if they suffer re­­taliation for complaining. Retaliation is anything that would dissuade a reasonable employee from complaining in the first place. The key is “reasonable.”

HR Law 101: The Civil Rights Act of 1964 bars discrimination based on race, national origin and religion. The law applies to all employers that have at least 15 full- or part-time workers and includes U.S. companies that employ Americans abroad ...

As employers continue to try doing more with less, employees sometimes find themselves handling additional duties and responsibilities. That can cause real problems if it results in female employees doing extra work, and they wind up being paid less than male co-workers.
Two corporations that own a Ken­­tucky Fried Chicken franchise in Rocky Mount face an EEOC lawsuit after they fired a long-term employee for dress code violations.
Ordinarily, it takes a discharge, demotion or other serious decision to support a ­discrimination law­­suit. Being fired, demoted or not promoted are so-called adverse employment actions. But even a series of minor employment actions can amount to an adverse action under the right circumstances.
It’s become a little bit harder for women alleging pregnancy discrimination under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to win discharge lawsuits. To prevail, a new mother has to prove that pregnancy discrimination was a “substantial motivating factor” in her discharge.
Pittsburgh’s Guardian Angel Ambu­­lance Service faces an EEOC lawsuit alleging it breached a previous settlement agreement with a now-deceased former employee.
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