Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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The federal appeals court that covers Texas has come down on the side of an employer that fired a worker for insubordination for refusing to say a rosary. Reason: The employee never revealed that her religion prevented her from complying.
A manager at a Schenectady, N.Y. Subway franchise allegedly demanded sex from teenage applicants in exchange for jobs at the sandwich chain. Two underage girls reported the manager to the EEOC after he sent them explicit texts suggesting that they would be hired if they had sex with him.

It doesn’t take much for an employee who has been terminated to take a discrimination claim to court. For example, all a woman has to allege is that she is a member of a protected class (female), was qualified for her job, was discharged and was replaced by someone who is not a member of her protected class—that is, that a man replaced her. It’s then up to the employer to prove it had a legitimate, unrelated reason for the termination. It can’t rely strictly on her status as at-will.

A Muslim applicant for a driver helper position with UPS in Rochester, N.Y. is one of the lead plaintiffs in a class-action suit against the delivery service. The EEOC is suing on behalf of several men of various religions who have either allegedly been forced to shave to obtain a UPS job or been denied employment because of their religious beliefs.
Sometimes, it’s relatively easy to get a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit dismissed. If your workplace records can show that other employees became pregnant, took leave and never complained about any sort of pregnancy-related discrimination, that can serve as a powerful rebuttal to a lone complaint.
Generally, older employees who are turned down for promotions or aren’t hired must show that the person who was hired was younger. But how much younger? That question has now been answered by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
Garrison Contractors, a West Texas oil-industry construction company, has agreed to settle charges it retaliated against a female employee after she reported sexual harassment.
In conjunction with its 50th anniversary, the EEOC has compiled data showing that women and minorities have made significant yet still incomplete inroads in a changing employment landscape.
Arthur’s Bar & Restaurant in Addison, Texas, has agreed to settle a pregnancy discrimination complaint for $20,000.
Q. An employee was injured away from work. He is now demanding to return to work as an accommodation for his injuries, which he claims is a disability under both the ADA and Minnesota Human Rights Act. We do have a transitional work program, whereby we create work to aid workers injured on the job in returning to work. The work involves duties that we otherwise outsource, such as floor sweeping, etc. Our injured employee is not able to return to his prior position due to the physical nature of that job, and is now demanding that we provide him this sort of transitional work. Must we?
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