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Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Some employees can’t seem to get it together and do their jobs properly. While an underlying medical or psychological problem may be the cause, don’t assume that’s the case if the employee hasn’t asked for help or a reasonable accommodation.
Here’s a tip that can save you from needless litigation: Make sure supervisors don’t play favorites with some employees at the expense of others. You never know which employee will later claim she was excluded from the “inner circle” that got preferential treatment because of a protected characteristic.

HR Law 101: Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination prohibited under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Courts are increasingly taking a dim view of employers that don't take decisive action to prevent sexual harassment ...

A former car salesman who claimed a Cary dealership fired him because it felt selling cars was a “young man’s game” appears to have plucked victory from the jaws of legal defeat.

HR Law 101: A clearly written, thoughtful sexual harassment policy clarifies your position to everyone on your staff, including potential perpetrators and their victims. It also provides solid proof to judges and juries that you’re committed to eliminating and preventing sexual harassment. You may use this model policy or adapt it for your organization.

Ordinarily, the ADA doesn’t protect employees who have temporary physical problems that don’t last long or seriously interfere with their lives. But ailments and conditions that last indefinitely are another matter. That’s especially true for a veteran who the VA has rated as partially disabled by service-related injuries.
When so-called pro se litigants represent themselves before the EEOC and in federal court, you’ll need patience. It will pay off in the long run.
Here’s a tip for handling em­­ployees undergoing sex changes: Make sure the employee isn’t har­­assed and that it’s business as usual in the workplace. Treat the employee as you always have and don’t fear legitimate discipline or an evaluation based on performance.
Five former employees of Min­­ne­­tonka’s Equity Bank have agreed to a settlement in a lawsuit that alleged that the bank’s CEO barraged them with vulgar tirades, threatened to burn down their houses, kill them and dismember their children.

Following your own rules for discipline, promotion and evaluation is the best defense against a discrimination lawsuit. But that doesn’t mean you can’t make exceptions to your rules when the situation calls for it. Just make sure that you document why you made the exception at the time you did.

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