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Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Employees of United Health Pro­­grams of America, Inc. claimed that since 2007 they were coerced into participating in an offbeat religion called “Onionhead,” created by a family member of the employer.
Employers can now be required to provide accommodations to this class of workers.

Under some limited circumstances, employers may be obligated to suggest reasonable accommodations for struggling workers who have obvious disabilities that appear to interfere with their ability to perform essential job functions. But that’s really only true for em­­ployees whose disabilities are obvious and limit the employee’s ability to speak up for himself.

Sometimes, employers don’t learn about alleged discrimination or harassment until an employee brings up the claim when facing discharge for other reasons. If that happens, how should you respond?
Remind supervisors that they must never make jokes (or assumptions) about employees based on where they were born, their origins or other national or ethnic characteristics.

When harassment allegations surface, we often advise separating the two parties to minimize chances of more misbehavior. Sometimes, employees find their own ways to keep away from harassers. However, business realities can make that unsustainable.

While it’s always unacceptable, just because a man hits a female co-worker doesn’t mean she has a sex discrimination or harassment case.
You probably tell supervisors they shouldn’t punish employees for filing internal or EEOC discrimination complaints. That doesn’t mean employees who complain won’t perceive re­­tali­­ation in every slight change in their work situation. How you react can mean the difference between winning or losing a retaliation lawsuit.
A Detroit nonprofit formed to assist people with disabilities faces EEOC charges that it violated the ADA by discriminating against a deaf worker.
The city of McAllen seems to be turning a page with the departure of an assistant city manager. The official had previously filed a sexual harassment complaint against a former city manager who retired in March.
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