Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Here’s a reminder for the next time you provide harassment and discrimination training: Tell managers and supervisors that they should never comment on an em­­ployee’s religious preferences or make any assignments based on notions about certain religions.
Some employees behave in ways that create an unpleasant environment for their co-workers, subordinates or supervisors. There’s no reason to put up with bullies and other ill-behaved employees.

If an employee cares enough about a promotion, assignment or training opportunity to contact HR with a complaint, save the note, email or other communication. Here’s why.

New York City-based BNV Home Care faces an EEOC lawsuit after staff members complained that the company sought extensive family health histories as part of an “employee health assessment.”
Goodwill Industries will pay $100,000 to settle a long-standing lawsuit for retaliation filed by the EEOC.
When the EEOC gets wind of alleged discrimination, it is free to investigate that practice and sue the employer—all without naming an actual victim.
Some employees complain all the time and don’t get along with their bosses and co-workers. But if their complaints aren’t specific and don’t raise at least potential discrimination based on race, age, sex or some other protected characteristic, their complaints aren’t so-called “protected activity.” Therefore, they can’t be the basis for later retaliation claims.

Ordinarily, if a subordinate sues for alleged sexual harassment under Title VII, there is no personal liability for that supervisor. However, if the employer is a public agency or governmental unit, the rules change.

The EEOC has sued Arthur’s Res­tau­rant and Bar in Addison for pregnancy discrimination after a waitress who was expecting a baby was allegedly fired when she was “beginning to show.”
Q. One of my employees was recently injured in a nonwork-related accident. If this employee returns to work and requires an accommodation to perform his duties, can allowing him to telecommute be considered reasonable accommodation?
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