Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Employees who harass and abuse co-workers—and supervisors who turn a blind eye to bullying—may end up facing jail time.
The EEOC has issued proposed guidance on how it plans to enforce anti-harassment provisions of several federal laws.
Employers should improve their hiring and promotion systems if they discover problems that can be fixed. Doing so after an employee has filed a discrimination complaint isn’t tantamount to admitting guilt.
Pennsylvania courts are willing to let workers recover damages resulting from intentional infliction of emotional distress. However, the conduct must be “extreme and outrageous.”
The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals has concluded that employees cannot obtain “pain and suffering” awards from employers that violate the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.
The psychological test the Minneapolis Police Department uses to screen applicants is biased against minorities, according to some police officers.
Appealing to workers’ sense of decency will do nothing to prevent harassment lawsuits if that approach doesn’t effectively stop the harassment.
Constant badgering about retirement can backfire badly, especially if a supervisor also makes potentially ageist comments about the employee’s appearance, work habits or other characteristics.
Complaints of religious discrimination filed with the EEOC have increased by 50% since 2006 and 80% since 2001.
Employers that don’t immediately address allegations of sexual harassment—and stop it—will have a hard time defending themselves in court.
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