Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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OSHA's role is expansive and includes regulating everything from heat breaks to bathroom access. It issued “A Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers” on June 1.
Interviews are often critical for sorting through many apparently qualified job applicants, and it’s critical to properly handle the interview process. Be sure you treat candidates equally, asking the same interview questions of everyone.
In the wake of U.S. Supreme Court’s important Young v. UPS ruling in March, the EEOC has updated its employer guidelines on light-duty assignments and disparate treatment of pregnant workers. Download them now.
There's a long list of behaviors that can create a hostile, intimidating or offensive environment in the eyes of the law. Do you know everything that's on it?

Are you considering settling an ADA accommodations case by paying a lump sum? Do you think the employee could do his job with an accommodation? Then keep good records of your accommodations process, the medical records you used to consider possible accommodations and other information about the employee, his job and his abilities.

Former CBS News entertainment reporter Ken Lombardi claims two male bosses groped him and made unwanted advances, and a female boss refused to investigate his charges. According to lawsuit documents, Lombardi claims that Duane Tollison, then a senior producer, drunkenly groped him and kissed him on the neck at a holiday party.
That doesn’t mean employers should ignore a one-time incident or behavior brought to HR’s attention. You can and should end any behavior that may be perceived as offensive or harassing. Once you have, you can move on, as this recent Texas Supreme Court decision shows.
Some employees are sensitive to various chemicals such as perfumes and other strong smells. Accom­­­­mo­­dat­­ing the problem can be difficult, but it’s necessary if the condition rises to the level of a disability.
Some public employees in civil service positions may challenge their discharge through the civil service system. But doing so does have its dangers.

Employers that provide clear rules on what employees must do before being considered for promotions can reduce the possibility of failure-to-promote lawsuits. That’s because employees who don’t follow those clear rules can’t argue they weren’t promoted on account of their membership in a protected class. They lost out because they didn’t follow the rules.