Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Old City Philadelphia bar Rotten Ralph’s faces charges it discriminated against a Muslim employee when it refused to allow her to wear a khimar or head scarf during Ramadan.
A Westchester County, N.Y., Dunkin’ Donuts franchise finds itself in hot oil after a store manager allegedly slapped a female employee who refused his sexual advances.

Of course, supervisors should never say anything off-color, insensitive or downright stupid. Unfortunately, it happens. However, it takes more than one dumb outburst to support a discrimination claim unless the comment is obviously highly offensive. Less than that, and an employee’s lawsuit is likely to be tossed out.

A black teacher is suing for race discrimination after she was fired from her job at Park Center High School in Osseo, Minn.—after she complained about race discrimination.
Honoring members of the military is about more than thanking them for their service. Consider, for example, how two companies recently treated citizen soldiers in their employ—one well, the other allegedly not so well.

It is critical to prevent sexual harassment—especially when a supervisor is involved—instead of relying on your post-harassment policy to block lawsuits. The University of Minnesota just learned that the hard way.

A Wisconsin company has settled an EEOC age discrimination and retaliation lawsuit after it fired two employees—on their birthdays.
Erie, Pa.-based Erie Strayer Co. and Local 468 of the International Association of Bridge Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers have settled charges they violated the ADA when they required employees to provide detailed medical information in order to use paid sick leave.
Q. One of our employees is over age 70 and has had a broken foot, memory problems and a recent car wreck that caused some residual problems. Should we allow him to work? What can we do to protect ourselves from potential workers’ comp claims should he injure himself?
Wayne, Pa.-based temporary services firm Crothall Services Group faces an EEOC lawsuit alleging it failed to maintain records necessary to document the effect of its criminal background check policy on minorities.