Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Page 11 of 589« First...101112...203040...Last »

Generally, employees don’t have long to get the litigation ball rolling if they want to complain about discrimination. In most cases, they must file a complaint with the EEOC or a state agency within 300 days of an alleged discriminatory act. However, employees often have lots more leeway if they are claiming they had to work in a hostile environment characterized by repeated slurs or other harassing behavior.

Here’s a rather novel question being answered for the first time in the 5th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over Texas employers. Can the refusal to accept a request to rescind a resignation ever be an adverse em­­ployment action and retaliation for engaging in protected activity?
The EEOC has filed suit against staffing company Labor Ready Mid-Atlantic for actions occurring at its office in Washington, Pa.
Employees who get promotions generally don’t sue their employers, but an administrative specialist for the city of Austin, Texas, has done just that.
A mining company’s refusal to accommodate an employee’s religious belief has cost it $586,860. A federal jury in Pittsburgh decided that Consol Energy violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act when it refused an employee’s request to use an alternative method for tracking his hours.
A former professor at the University of Scranton has sued the university claiming it denied him tenure and fired him because of his Greek heritage.
When an employee gets fired, his thoughts may turn to filing a lawsuit—maybe based on some suddenly remembered comment that he took as offensive or another supposedly discriminatory act. Fortunately, courts are rarely persuaded.
Under federal law and New York state law, merely rejecting a supervisor’s sexual advances without reporting the conduct to HR probably isn’t protected activity. However, that’s not the case under the New York City Human Rights Law.
Albert Forlizzi II has fallen a long way. Now unemployed, the former supervisor at the State Department of Revenue and former mayor of Pen­­brook has been sentenced to four years probation after pleading no contest to charges of indecent assault and official oppression.
On Oct. 7, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 703 (SB 703), protecting transgender employees whose employers engage in business with state agencies.