Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Employees who claim they quit be-cause their employer wouldn’t address harassment or discrimination are eligible for unemployment compensation benefits—if they gave the employer a chance to remedy the situation.
Here’s a common sense conclusion: Firing someone you suspect may be a racist is a legitimate decision.
An attorney with long experience working for Pennsylvania state agencies has filed an EEOC complaint alleging that the state’s Office of Open Records refused to hire him because of his age.
You never know which fired employee will sue. That’s why it’s important to make sure every disciplinary decision is based on solid business reasons. You may even want to create an internal disciplinary checklist to ensure managers and supervisors know how to document discipline.
A Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen franchisee in Chester County faces an EEOC lawsuit for allegedly refusing to hire three applicants because of their age.
Some workers think that anytime their employer criticizes an emotional state or suggests therapy, the employer is “regarding” them as disabled. Thus, goes the argument, the employer violates the ADA when it tries to intervene.
No doubt the attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., have had a dramatic effect on the workplace for employees who are, or are perceived to be, Muslim or Middle Eastern. Here are some scenarios in Q&A format, compiled by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to help managers ensure that their workplaces are bias-free.
Q. One of our employees recently shouted at his supervisor, and in doing so violated a work rule. In the course of counseling and disciplining—but not discharging—this employee stated for the first time that he has a disorder which might have caused his conduct. May we still discipline this employee?
Certainly, train your managers that they cannot use common racist phrases and names. But go beyond the obvious and provide examples of other terms and behaviors that may not seem obvious. The following case provides an example.
If you find out that a supervisor may have treated a disabled worker poorly, fix the problem promptly.
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