Discrimination and Harassment

Discrimination and harassment claims often increase in a down economy. Learn the proper techniques for conducing proper workplace harassment investigations, providing sexual harassment training, and more to reduce claims of employment discrimination and preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

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Think twice before requiring workers to participate in religiously oriented training. It may violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.
A new front has opened in the war to determine if McDonald’s, along with its franchisees, is liable as a joint employer for employment law violations.
The Montevideo, Minn. School District has settled an equal pay discrimination suit with the EEOC for $50,000.
When investigating an employee’s complaint of harassment—sexual or otherwise—tailor your inquiries to the facts of that case.
Some employees seem to think they are owed a workplace that is perfectly fair and equitable all the time. Sadly, perfection isn’t possible.
The EEOC has sued the Laquila Group alleging it tolerated racial harassment of black employees and retaliated against at least one who complained.
When an employee is disciplined or otherwise punished for complaining that her employer is discriminating against certain customers, she can sue—and quite possibly win a large financial award.
If you reject a qualified candidate but leave the position open while still seeking someone with similar qualifications, that’s an open invitation to be sued for discrimination.

You can terminate a disabled individual if you conclude the employee can’t under perform the essential functions of a job with or without accommodations.

Employees who file EEOC suits can’t go back years with pay claims unless they can show some sort of continuing violation.  Merely having complained for years—even decades—about unfair pay isn’t enough.
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