Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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A who’s who of some of the nation’s largest private-sector employers have formed a lobbying group to “advocate for better medical outcomes to injured workers and give employers a choice in how they will manage employee benefits.” Critics say the Association for Responsible Alternatives to Workers’ Compensation is out to gut workers’ comp laws.
The owner of five Manhattan Papa John’s pizza franchises will be out a little dough after a state court ruled he didn’t properly pay his delivery people.
Bart Lorang, founder and CEO of cloud-based contact-management app firm FullContact in Denver, pays each of his employees $7,500 extra each year to go on vacation.
Starting April 1, Vodafone employees may take up to 16 weeks of paid maternity leave—and be able to work 30-hour weeks at full pay for six months after they return to work.
Only a handful of employers have considered reducing full-time employees’ hours to dodge the employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new survey by the Society for Human Resource Management.
Effective July 1, 2015, deadlines for reconsideration or appeal of unemployment insurance benefit rulings, determinations, computation or administrative law judge decisions will be extended from 20 days to 30 days.

Under California law, employees must receive a rest break for every four hours worked and employers may not require employees to work during their breaks. But what about employees who are allowed to take breaks and do what they wish during that time but still have to respond to calls if necessary? In a recent case, security guards asked that question because they had to carry their radios during breaks in case they were suddenly needed.

The improving economy is bolstering dreams of retirement for many Americans. The number of workers age 60 or older who say they are delaying retirement has reached a post-recession low of 53%.
More than 80% of U.S. employers expect to make changes to their health benefit programs over the next three years, despite cost increases remaining at historically low levels, according to new research from the Towers Watson HR consulting firm.
Most employers know they must send a COBRA notice to terminated workers no longer covered by the company health plan. COBRA letters tell former employees they can continue their health insurance coverage for 18 months if they begin paying the entire premium, plus a small service fee. But what happens if the employee hasn’t been fired, but instead has been placed on an unpaid suspension pending possible discharge?
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