Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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The Texas workers’ compensation system is designed to replace the wages of employees who miss work due to on-the-job injuries. The system works as a no-fault guarantee. Employees who can show they were injured while working are entitled to a portion of their earnings and paid medical care for those injuries. They needn’t prove their employer was negligent. In exchange, injured employees can’t sue employers for negligence ...

The Georgia workers’ compensation system protects employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The State Board of Workers’ Compensation administers the law, which the Georgia legislature modified in 2006 ...

As of Jan. 1, 2007, California employers must pay a state minimum wage of $7.50 per hour, which increases to $8 per hour on Jan. 1, 2008. The minimum wage applies to all workers except ...

In March 2006, the Michigan legislature passed a new minimum wage law, but then amended it in August to address concerns that the new rate would entitle large segments of Michigan’s work force to overtime pay ...

The New Jersey workers’ compensation system is designed to protect employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The system works as a no-fault guarantee ...

California local governments can, and sometimes do, legislate their own rules for employers within their jurisdictions. For example, San Francisco County requires employers to provide paid sick leave. After 90 days on the job, all employees in the city and the county begin accruing paid sick leave at the rate of one hour for every 30 hours worked ...

Local governments in Michigan can, and sometimes do, legislate their own rules for employers within their jurisdictions. For example, several municipalities have living-wage laws stipulating higher pay than the state minimum wage, as well as bans on sexual orientation discrimination ...

The Texas Payday Act seems like it should be simple, but it’s perhaps the most complicated employment law in the state. Full of traps for the unwary, the law can spell big trouble for even innocent mistakes. Plus, it carries a fine of up to $1,000 per violation ...

The New Jersey Law Against Discrimination makes it unlawful to subject people to differential treatment based on race, creed, color, national origin, nationality, ancestry, age, sex (including pregnancy), marital status, domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait, genetic information, liability for military service, mental or physical disability, perceived disability, AIDS and HIV status ...

Ohio’s workers’ compensation system protects employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (www.ohiobwc.com/) administers the law. The system works as a no-fault guarantee ...

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