Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

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Employers have the right to expect their employees will generally show up for and leave work as scheduled. Workers who, without a good reason, are frequently late or leave early aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation if they’re fired. Those absences, even if largely unintentional, are misconduct.
A Texas company has been awarded attorneys’ fees as compensation for aggressive DOL tactics.
People with health insurance continue to express higher satisfaction with traditional health plans compared with so-called “consumer-driven” plans, but the satisfaction gap appears to be narrowing, according to new research from the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Here’s a reminder that job duties are what determine exempt status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. You cannot classify someone as exempt based just on job title or education. For example, requiring a college degree for jobs that really could be performed without such training and experience doesn’t magically make the employee ineligible for overtime protection.

Employees discharged for being absent may still be eligible for unemployment compensation. That’s because employees must have committed willful misconduct to lose the right to benefits. An employee fired for missing work because he couldn’t call in or otherwise comply with his employer’s call-off procedure, for example, would still be eligible.
Well-paid private-sector employees are more than three times more likely to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan than their lower-paid colleagues.
How can employers actually use the new CEO-to-median-employee pay ratio rule to their advantage?
When the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, plenty of HR pros started to wonder: Do we even need to offer health benefits to employees’ domestic partners anymore?
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Aug. 5 adopted a final rule that requires public companies to disclose the ratio of chief executive officer compensation to the median compensation employees receive.
When one CEO decided to pay all his employees at least $70,000 per year, accolades rolled in. The raises even came out of the CEO’s own compensation package. So why, then, did there come such terrific backlash?
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