Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

North Carolina’s minimum wage is $6.15 per hour, compared to the current federal minimum wage of $5.85 per hour. However, barring action by the state legislature, the federal minimum wage will overtake North Carolina’s minimum wage next year ...

The North Carolina Wage Payment and Collection Act seems like it should be rather simple, but it’s perhaps the most complicated employment law in the state. Full of traps for the unwary, the law can spell big trouble for even innocent mistakes. The law covers all North Carolina private employers, even those with only one employee, and requires employers to pay their employees monthly ...

Local governments in North Carolina sometimes legislate their own rules for employers within their jurisdictions. For example, Durham County and the city of Durham have living-wage laws stipulating higher pay than the state minimum wage ($6.15 per hour) while Orange County has its own human rights ordinance ...

The Indiana workers’ compensation system is designed to protect employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The Indiana Workers’ Compensation Board (www.in.gov/workcomp) administers the law. The system works as a no-fault guarantee ...

In conjunction with the recent increase in the federal minimum wage, Indiana hiked its minimum wage from $5.15 to $5.85 per hour (effective July 24, 2007). Over the next two years, the state minimum wage will increase (along with the federal minimum wage) by 70 cents per hour in two phases ...

Employers must pay their employees on payday—and make sure the money is in the bank. Otherwise, they risk liability for double the amount due as liquidated damages under the Fair Labor Standards Act ...

A federal judge has overturned his earlier decision in a Fair Labor Standards Act case involving several women who had been hired to sell houses in a new subdivision. The women claimed Brayson Homes owed them overtime and minimum wages ...

You may remember that the U.S. Supreme Court decided a donning and doffing case about a year ago. That might have been the end of the matter. But nothing is simple when it comes to employment law. Recently, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that workers cannot demand pay for time spent donning and doffing their uniforms in most circumstances ...

California’s unemployment compensation law requires employers to pay into the system for all employees. Independent contractors, on the other hand, are on their own. That might make it tempting to redefine some employees as independent contractors. Don’t do so without careful guidance from your attorney! ...

The title of recent congressional hearings—“The Misclassification of Workers as Independent Contractors”—says it all. Some in Congress are looking to change the Fair Labor Standards Act to further define who is an “employee” and who is an “independent contractor” ...