Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

While the federal Equal Pay Act prohibits wage discrimination against women, it doesn’t require every employee in the same position to earn the same salary. If you can point to factors other than gender (e.g., seniority, education, experience, skills, etc.), you can set different salaries for employees who hold the same job titles ...

Employers must stay abreast of an alphabet soup of federal laws—ADA, ADEA, FMLA and so forth—each with its own requirements. To comply, you first must know which laws apply to your business, based on the number of people you employ. Here's how to tell which laws affect your workplace ... and which ones you can safely ignore.

How can you cut operating expenses down to size? Using more independent contractors might be the answer. But you can’t simply label workers as “independent contractors” when it suits your needs. Stick to your guns for legit arrangements. In a pinch, you might rely on “Section 530 relief” to bail you out.

Lawyers representing employees in class-action wage-and-hour cases often look for ways to boost the amount of damages they can collect. One of the most common ways to do that: Bring in a host of state laws to set the employer’s punishment. That won’t work any longer in North Carolina and other Mid-Atlantic states. The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals has rejected the tactic ...

Employers often ask: “Will I be liable if one of my independent contractors injures someone?” The short answer is, “It depends.” A recent case from the North Carolina Court of Appeals adds new considerations to the long answer ...

Sometimes, a problem employee claims harassment as a way to protect herself from legitimate discipline. When that happens, it may be tempting to ignore such claims on the presumption they are bogus. It may be tempting to dismiss her complaints as much ado about nothing. But you’ll ignore her at your own peril ...

California workers who earn the minimum wage will see their pay increase to $8 per hour starting Jan. 1, 2008. California and Massachusetts have the nation’s highest state minimum wages ...

Jacqueline Bowbin sued Bulkmatic Transport Inc. for gender discrimination, alleging violations of the Equal Pay Act. In 2006, Bowbin claims, her supervisor told her she would be well into a six-figure salary with bonuses and stock compensation. But that year, Bulkmatic apparently did not award either, companywide. Bowbin cried gender discrimination ...

If you thought last year’s U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Ledbetter case made it clear that employees must file EEOC complaints within 300 days of suffering a discriminatory pay decision, think again. That deadline applies only to sex discrimination cases brought under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act ...