Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits topics – whether it’s minimum wage, workers’ compensation laws, or employee pay – if properly handled, can help you retain workers and recruit new ones.

Use our advice to craft independent contractor agreements that keep independent contractors – and your bosses – happy.

Q. Our policy prohibits employees from working overtime without specific written authorization from their supervisor. Our policy manual provides that employees will not be compensated for overtime hours worked unless they comply with this policy. Can we legally refuse to pay our employees for unauthorized overtime? ...
Present and former FedEx Ground/Home Delivery drivers are eligible to join a class-action suit that challenges the company’s long-standing practice of classifying drivers as independent contractors. The suit—which more than 27,000 drivers could join—argues that they are employees ...
Q. While a manager at one of our locations was on vacation, we performed an audit of her books and discovered that she had written unauthorized checks to herself totaling $25,000. We intend to confront her and terminate her. What else should we do? ...
A bill approved by the state House in June—the Construction Industry Independent Contractor Act—would make intentionally misclassifying workers as independent contractors a third-degree felony for employers in residential or commercial construction. Cases of negligence would constitute a summary offense ...
Current and former FedEx Ground/Home Delivery drivers are eligible to join a class-action suit that challenges the company’s long-standing practice of classifying drivers as independent contractors. The suit—which more than 27,000 drivers could join—argues that they are employees ...
Employers can and should get applicants and employees to agree to pay back training costs if they depart before the company gets fair value. But collecting the money can be tricky. You can’t, for example, withhold the money out of a final paycheck if that move takes the employee’s hourly wage below the minimum allowed by law ...
Effective July 24, the federal minimum wage is now $6.55 per hour. That will increase again on July 24, 2009, to $7.25 per hour. If you haven’t already done so, make sure your posters are up-to-date and reflect the new figure ...
Test your knowledge of recent trends in employment law, comp & benefits and other HR issues with our monthly mini-quiz ...
Q. We have an employee who has a “bad back.” We have medical reports indicating he has a congenital back problem that frequently causes severe pain. Although he has a light-duty job, he frequently misses work because of his back pain and often seeks workers’ compensation benefits during his absences. Are we always going to be liable for workers’ compensation benefits when his back prevents him from working? ...
In tough economic times, organizations sometimes have to make hard choices—such as whether to temporarily lay off employees. Of course, you’ll hope to ramp up staffing when the economy rebounds. That’s when you’ll need to be extra careful. If you bar workers you laid off from being rehired, you may be courting trouble ...