HR Soapbox

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To be protected under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), employees must give employers enough information about the reason for their leave to let the employer decide if it falls under FMLA coverage. A recent court ruling deals with an ultra-modern twist on this issue: Does a text message sent by an employee legally put a company on notice of their need for FMLA leave?

This year, the traditional open enrollment season for health benefits coincides with the rollout of massive changes driven by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The law requires employers to inform employees about their coverage options by Oct. 1. Here are seven tips on how to improve your benefits communication during this open enrollment season ...

HR professionals have all seen their fair share of unique pitches from applicants. When those efforts are appropriate manifestations of the candidate's creativity and intiative, the extra energy can translate into a job offer. In other cases, applicants' efforts to differentiate themselves are simply a big-time turn-off. Here’s a collection of memorable attention-getters—10 that worked and 10 that didn’t ...

The American Medical Association (AMA) this summer officially designated obesity as a “disease”—instead of as a condition. The AMA’s designation does not carry any official change in the law or regulations. But experts say it could increase the likelihood that obese employees will be deemed “disabled” under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), plus increase your organization's workers' comp costs.
As the economy slowly gains strength, so do pay increases doled out by U.S. employers. Employers, on average, anticipate increasing employee salaries by 2.9% in 2014, a marginal boost from 2.8% this year. But more employers are focusing bigger raise dollars on their top-performing employees.
The HR Soapbox hit the road again this summer for the annual Society for Human Resource Management conference, this year in Chicago. Here are some lessons learned …
If your organization uses interns—or plans to do so—take note of this month’s ruling in the closely watched “Black Swan” case. A federal court in New York said Fox Searchlight Pictures violated wage-and-hour laws by failing to pay interns who did menial tasks during production of the Oscar-nominated movie “Black Swan.” The case is a timely reminder that, in almost all cases, employers must pay interns at least the minimum wage, no matter how basic their work is.
Studies show that as the temperature rises, the potential for employment law problems heats up in the workplace. What should employers do? Here's a five-point to-do list for summer ...

When some older workers hear the word “slow,” they may immediately assume that’s a code word for “old.” But as a new court ruling shows, if you have employees who can’t meet the job’s required—and preferably written—performance levels, you’re not required to keep them on staff, regardless of their ages.  Here's how to handle this legally tricky situation ...

Why do your employees leave? Amid the typical 3M reasons—money, motivation and manager quality—employers often miss out on a simple, no-cost way to keep employees happy and on the farm. How? Communicate your promotion policy and announce when workers are promoted.

Unless employees can see and understand the path to promotion at your organization, they’re more likely to seek advancement outside of your walls. Use these 5 guidelines to create announcements that provide concrete examples of what employees must do to get promoted ...

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