Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions

 

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Tough Talks

From bad attitudes to bad language to bad breath …

Want to handle delicate situations with ease – while minimizing legal risks? Follow the simple, clear guidelines in Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions.

Available as a CD or MP3, this 75-minute audio training helps you gain the outcomes you want from your most challenging conversations with employees. You also receive the presentation materials from the popular webinar by your trainer, Allison West.

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Dear Colleague:

Inappropriate attire … lack of personal hygiene … tardiness.

The last thing you want to do is confront an employee about an awkward subject, but you simply must do it – for the sake of the employee, his co-workers and your company – because such behaviors can damage morale, curb productivity and even trigger legal action.

Fortunately, you don’t have to confront these thorny issues alone …
Help is here: the audio training tool, Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions. In just 75 minutes, your trainer, Allison West, Esq., SPHR, teaches you how to handle a wide range of sticky situations. (Sometimes literally sticky – such as employees not washing hands after sneezing.)
As an attorney and founder of the motivational training firm Employment Practices Specialists, Allison is uniquely qualified to advise you. She uses her employment law background and vast knowledge of HR practices to help employers prevent and resolve employment claims, and she’s a popular presenter at the Society for Human Resource Management’s national conferences.

Allison’s webinar on Tough Talks was so well-received, we’re offering the complete audio of the session in your choice of CD or MP3. Either way, it includes the follow-up Q&A that illuminates and expands upon several issues.

You get the PowerPoint from the webinar, too, so you can focus on the training take-aways instead of having to write everything down. The PowerPoint also serves as a handy reference whenever a tough talk is coming up.
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Who needs Tough Talks? Anyone who engages in tough talks with employees. HR professionals, supervisors, executives, office managers, business owners – we all have those tricky situations to deal with.

It comes with the territory: If you’re in HR or you manage people, you’ll eventually be forced into some very difficult discussions.

Sometimes the talks are about obvious workplace performance issues, such as tardiness or excessive breaks. Sometimes they’re about issues that may seem personal – too much perfume, too little deodorant, too much cleavage, too much swearing – but may become performance issues when they affect the work environment … or legal issues when they constitute harassment.

In any event, these are serious discussions. Allison kicks off the presentation with guidelines that help every tough talk go more smoothly:
  • Timing. When to begin planning the conversation, and how much time to allow. (Hint: Jot down the date and time of problem occurrences. You’ll want them when the employee demands to know, “When exactly did I do that?”)
  • Your state of mind. Be firm yet compassionate. And always fair, which means having all the facts.
  • The recipient’s reaction. You know the employee. Will he or she be in denial or become defensive – or blame others? Plan ahead.
  • Absolute expressions. Never say never … or always … or every time. Unless, of course, it’s completely accurate. Is the employee really always late?
  • Starting sentences with you or your. Avoid these to avoid sounding accusatory. Instead of “You sounded unprofessional with the client,” say “I noticed you were having a difficult time with the client and sounded frustrated.”
  • “As you know …” Don’t say that. The employee may not know about the problem.
  • The power of guilt. Don’t hesitate to use guilt as a motivator. If someone’s behavior is offending colleagues or making their lives harder, say so.
  • Potential red flags for discrimination. If you tell people they aren’t team players or don’t fit in, it can come back to hurt you. What if the team is all of one race, except the employee?
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Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions tells you precisely how to deal with the most sensitive issues in the workplace, from fragrances to F-bombs.

Once you’ve learned the main guidelines from Tough Talks, it’s time to dig deep. You’ll appreciate Allison’s no-holds-barred advice on:
  • Bad breath and body odor. Be sensitive. Try the mint hint. And be sure not to ask the cause of the problem. That could raise legal issues if the condition is medical, or if it’s due to religious or cultural differences regarding foods.
  • Fragrances. People are very invested in their scents and don’t want to change them. But what if the worker in the next cubicle has allergies?
  • Profanity. An occasional swear word may not be a problem, but constant profanity can alienate workers and clients. Combine profanity and anger and you can get a hostile work environment – which means liability. Better get this under control – fast!
  • Gossip. True or not, it hurts. A “Respect in the Workplace” policy can go a long way toward alleviating this problem.
  • Smokers who take excessive breaks. Go for the guilt with this group. Other workers have to take up any slack.
  • Complainers and whiners. Allison gives you several ways to turn around people who always moan and groan. Examples:

    • When someone complains, ask “How can you fix that?”
    • Teach the employee to turn a complaint into a request. “The vendor never calls us soon enough to ship by the 15th” becomes “I’d like to ask the vendor to call us back sooner.”
    • Tell employees to bring a complaint only if they also bring at least one idea for a solution.
  • Annoying music. When one worker’s music affects other workers’ performance, there’s a one-word solution: headphones. Music never trumps productivity.
  • Revealing attire. Short, slitted skirts and canyons of cleavage raise issues of professionalism and productivity. The wrong attire can create a hostile work environment, too. Warning: Never let a male supervisor discuss clothing alone with a female employee.
For dealing with these topics, Allison gives you the actual words to say. If you wonder how you could ever tell an employee he or she has bad breath, well, now you can stop wondering. Allison gives you the script.
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checkbox Yes, send me Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions. I'll review the audio recording and presentation materials risk-free. If I'm dissatisfied for any reason, I'll get a 100% refund.
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No more worrying. Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions removes the fear and puts you in control.

If the employee is the one who needs to change a behavior, how come you’re the one who’s nervous about the conversation?

It won’t be that way anymore, not when you’ve had the training Allison gives you. You’ll know:
  • How to address a manager who’s accused of age discrimination, and whether or not to cite witnesses. (Allison cites a major case at Google on this issue.)
  • How to deal with religious and political talk around the water cooler. Be sure you know what the law says you may not forbid.
  • How to handle the most sensitive topic of all: termination. From where to have the meeting to how long it should take. What to say, and what not to say.
Whether you listen in the car, at work or while exercising, your 75 minutes with Allison will go by fast – including the Q&A period where she helps callers solve tricky problems.
Thanks to this training, there’s no need for HR professionals and supervisors to be paralyzed with fear when dealing with employees who present tough problems. Just because an employee feels picked on, it’s not discrimination. With Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions, you can focus on improving your employees without worrying about lawyers.
Should you be compassionate? Yes. Tactful? Of course. But Allison’s main advice is to be straightforward and succinct. Get to the point. Help the employee solve the problem. There’s no need for sugarcoating. Your goal is to help an otherwise solid performer stay on board.

As a supervisor myself, with employees who are mostly wonderful but not always perfect, I urge you to give Allison a listen and take her advice to heart. You’ll see a big difference when your employees are listening to you during those tough talks.


Sincerely,



Phillip Ash
Publisher
Your 100% Money-Back Guarantee
checkbox Yes, send me Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions. I'll review the audio recording and presentation materials risk-free. If I'm dissatisfied for any reason, I'll get a 100% refund.
Help me with tough talks. Send the recording.
We respect your privacy.
P.S. Having a conversation with an employee about a sensitive issue is never easy. Now you can make that part of your job significantly better by putting into practice the expert training you’ll find in Tough Talks: How to Conduct Difficult Employee Discussions. Order your audio training today!


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