Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss

 

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Personnel Records

Do your files contain a liability time bomb? A little housekeeping can prevent a lot of trouble.

Some records you must keep – but for how long?
Some records you must destroy – but which ones, and when?
Better know for sure – before you get hit with a lawsuit.
Better get Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss.

This Executive Summary helps you cut the clutter today and keep the ammunition you may need for a lawsuit tomorrow – or years from now. Available as a PDF download or printed copy.

checkbox Yes, tell me what I may toss, what I must toss, what I have to keep, and how long I should keep it. Send me Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss for a risk-free review. If I'm not 100% satisfied, I'll get back every penny, no questions asked.
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Dear Colleague:

Can’t those people in government make up their minds?

First they say there are certain personnel records you must keep for a given length of time. Then they say you have to destroy certain records by a given deadline.

No sense complaining about it. Just get it done.

But wait, it’s not that simple …

Just because the government says you have to keep documents for a certain length of time, is it smart to destroy them when that time arrives? No! Because irate employees and their lawyers don’t follow guidelines when deciding to hit you with a huge lawsuit for unfair termination, discrimination, whatever they can cook up – even a class-action suit.
That’s why you need Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss. With this clear, concise Executive Summary, not only will you know what the law says about retaining or destroying specific documents, you’ll also know what our legal expert says. In most cases, the recommended retention period is longer than the government mandates – often three times as long.
In the good old days, you at least had the option of simply saving everything. But not anymore, because there are certain documents you must destroy.

You wouldn’t want to save everything anyway. All those boxes take up too much space in your office, or cost too much money to put into storage. It’s so much better to know when to hold ’em, know when to shred ’em.
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checkbox Yes, send me Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss so I can resolve this document retention issue once and for all. I'll have your no-risk, money-back guarantee in case I'm dissatisfied for any reason.
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We’re not superstitious, but 13 sure seems like an unlucky number when it comes to personnel records. Because there are 13 types of personnel records that can land you in very hot water if you don’t handle them correctly. Rest assured, Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss tells you exactly what to do in each situation.

You’ll be amazed at how much information we’ve packed into this brief Executive Summary. In just 19 pages, this easy-to-read, easy-to-follow report brings you up to speed on 13 categories of personnel docs:
  • Job advertisements
  • Job applications
  • I-9 forms
  • Employee handbooks
  • EEO forms/affirmative action plans
  • Payroll deduction authorizations
  • Performance reviews
  • Disciplinary actions
  • FMLA leave forms
  • OSHA injury logs
  • Disability files
  • Wage/hour records
  • Workplace investigations
For every category, you’ll know both the federal statutory requirement and the recommended retention period to help protect yourself in case of a lawsuit. That recommendation carries weight, because it comes from nationally recognized employment-law attorney Jonathan Landesman, the expert behind this Executive Summary.

You could pay hundreds of dollars an hour, thousands of dollars in all, to consult with Jonathan about the legalities and liabilities surrounding personnel records. Instead, get your copy of Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss for less than the price of dinner at a good steakhouse.
Your 100% Money-Back Guarantee
checkbox Yes, send me Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss so I can resolve this document retention issue once and for all. I'll have your no-risk, money-back guarantee in case I'm dissatisfied for any reason.
Rush me the report at no risk.
We respect your privacy.
If it only told you which documents to save or not, Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss would be invaluable. But we’ve made it even more valuable by packing in dozens of helpful hints on how to stay out of trouble.

Say you get sued by a former employee who holds a grudge. You produce the personnel documents you’ve so carefully saved – not only as long as the government insists, but as long as our Executive Summary recommends. Case dismissed, time to celebrate – yes?

That depends on the documents. So we asked Jonathan Landesman to add recommended best practices for every one of the 13 categories. For example:
  • Job advertisements. Yes, these are considered personnel records, even though you haven’t hired anybody yet. Be careful how you word them. If you say, “Seeking an applicant with high energy,” the EEOC could say you’re looking for someone younger than 40, which could trigger an age-bias claim against you.
  • Job applications. Are you allowed to ask about disabilities? Fluency in English? Whether or not the applicant owns a car? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Get the report for details.
  • I-9 forms for employment eligibility. By all means, keep the forms. But what about copies of supporting documents, such as a driver’s license and Social Security card? What if Immigration or DOL says they look fraudulent? Can you show you acted in good faith?
  • Employee handbooks. Does your handbook have an “employment at will” disclaimer? A “safe-harbor policy” to protect you against wage-and-hour litigation regarding overtime? It will after you read the Executive Report.
  • EEO forms and affirmative action plans. If your business requires an EEO-1 form – and our report will tell you if it does – by all means, file one. But just because you’re subject to affirmative active law, should you also have an affirmative action plan? Careful, there’s big liability potential here.
  • Payroll deduction authorizations. When do they require an employee’s signature? What if wages are garnished through a court order – does the employee still have to sign? What if he or she refuses to sign? All good questions. All answered in our report.
We’ve touched on just a few of the helpful hints in fewer than half of the 13 categories. But even with just a glimpse, you can see the tremendous advantage of having this Executive Summary on hand.

When you comply with government rules for saving documents … go above and beyond the rules as we recommend … and follow our suggestions for making those documents bulletproof … it’s a lot easier to prevail against angry employees and hungry attorneys.
Your 100% Money-Back Guarantee
checkbox Yes, send me Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss so I can resolve this document retention issue once and for all. I'll have your no-risk, money-back guarantee in case I'm dissatisfied for any reason.
Rush me the report at no risk.
We respect your privacy.
Reducing office clutter and storage costs … easily complying with complex laws … creating documents that help you prevent lawsuits or prevail when they happen … and you still haven’t ordered Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss? Okay, we’ll give you even more reasons.

“Jonathan,” we said to our expert, “Business Management Daily customers demand and receive maximum value from our products. How can you give them even more?” Jonathan stepped right up and added special sections, including:
  • Details on the FTC’s records disposal rule. The government says you must “reasonably” destroy paper and electronic records containing data that could be used for identity theft. But the government didn’t define “reasonably,” and you shouldn’t, either. Instead, get our expert’s take on the subject. It could save you from a $2,500 fine – or a class-action lawsuit.
  • The “separate files” requirement. Good grief! Not only must you retain tons of documents, but for some them, you must keep the paperwork in a separate file. We tell you what goes where.
  • Reviewing old personnel files. Do you have information that was once lawful, but now needs purging to eliminate legal risk? For example, since the ADA took effect in 1990, there’s a new rule on medical records. As with all things governmental, compliance isn’t just an option, it’s a must.
  • Employee access to files. What rights do employees have to review their files? How about former employees? Their attorneys? Yes, you must follow the rules, but why make access any easier than you have to? Learn what limits you may set.
  • The impact of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. This law basically eliminates the statute of limitations for filing pay-bias claims. Now workers can go back decades and claim discrimination. How should that impact your record retention?
  • Federal rules on electronic record-keeping. In this brave new world, employers must retain a vast amount of information, even though emails often create the “smoking gun” that leads to a large judgment in a lawsuit. Get our expert’s take on this vital topic.
It all comes down to three choices: 1) Don’t think about personnel records and be in denial until a lawsuit hits … 2) cobble together your own system and blindly hope you do it right … or 3) get Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss and act with confidence. You’ll be following recommendations from a respected employment attorney, at a tiny fraction of what such information would normally cost you.

I urge you to order Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss at absolutely no risk. See the value for yourself. Get the clear, concise guidance you need to minimize liability with minimal effort.


Sincerely,



Phillip A. Ash
Publisher
Your 100% Money-Back Guarantee
checkbox Yes, send me Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss so I can resolve this document retention issue once and for all. I'll have your no-risk, money-back guarantee in case I'm dissatisfied for any reason.
Rush me the report at no risk.
We respect your privacy.
P.S. I run a company myself, so I understand that dealing with personnel records is not at the top of your want-to-do list. You may have the urge to brush this subject under the rug and forget about it.

But the law won’t forget about you.

I’d hate to see a legal disaster strike your company because of a simple record-keeping error. Please order now, with the reassurance of my unconditional, money-back guarantee.
P.P.S. I almost forgot to mention the appendix of this Executive Summary. It’s a chart that lists the 13 types of records, the federal statutory period for retaining them, and our expert’s recommended retention period.

Unlike the human appendix, which is useless, this appendix alone is worth the modest price of Personnel Records: What to Keep, What to Toss. See for yourself at no risk.


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