Centerpiece

There’s no getting around it. Sooner or later you must summon a problem employee into your office to set him or her straight. How you conduct this meeting can mean the difference between turning a recalcitrant employee around or opening up your organization to costly litigation.

Do your hiring managers know the law when it comes to asking medical or health-related questions during job interviews? Are your job applications toeing the legal line and complying with the ADA?
As an HR professional, you’re in a unique position to guide your organization to a culture that causes less worry and stress for employees—and better health and productivity. Here are 12 ways to get started:

The best meetings don’t happen by accident. For Al Pittampalli, author of Read This Before Our Next Meeting, the key to worthwhile meetings is to distribute relevant material to participants ahead of time, and hold them accountable for reading the content.

Some teams struggle to work together. Personalities clash, disagreements intensify and meetings turn into protracted turf battles. When groups become polarized, shake up the status quo. Try these techniques to reverse a downhill spiral so that teams regain their footing.

It happens all the time: An employee approaches someone from HR to ask for help. But occasionally, HR pros find their work conversations veering dangerously toward inappropriately personal topics—from how to handle retirement investments to life-and-death health care decisions.

Although high-income taxpayers entered 2013 with a cloud of uncertainty hanging over their heads, this much was clear: You’ll have to contend with a new 3.8% Medicare surtax on investment earnings. The new surtax was included in the 2010 health care law upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court.

It’s been a month since many of your employees made New Year’s resolutions to quit smoking in 2013. Are they sticking to their plans? The fact is, you should know. Plenty of evidence reveals that an employer can play a big role in helping employees snuff out their last cigarettes.

Hourly employees’ use of smartphones (as well as online email access from remote locations) has boosted worker productivity. However, it has also substantially increased the risk of off-the-clock-work violations.

You might spend more time navigating in Word documents than you actually do creating or editing content. Unlike pilots and boat skippers, we’re not taught to navigate the sea of text we encounter every day in our documents. Some handy tips: