Centerpiece

Every company wants managers who can efficiently identify, define and resolve problems. Don’t assume that management applicants with top references and experience have great analytical skills. Instead, find out for yourself by asking some of these questions.

Nervous public speakers tend to rush. They mumble, mutter and stammer their way through their speeches, yearning to finish and get off the stage. Yet there’s a simple technique that calms anxious presenters: the well-timed pause. Use these guidelines to decide when to apply one.

Federal labor law requires HR professionals to do a lot of different things. Writing job descriptions is not one of them. Because this arduous task is optional, many organizations skip right over it. That’s not wise. There are many practical and legal reasons to draft (and up­­date) job descriptions.

Hurricane Sandy ... the derecho last June ... employers must be prepared for a variety of disaster scenarios. Two very practical matters employers must deal with in the aftermath of a disaster: workplace cleanup and paying workers. Federal law affects both.

It takes a variety of personalities and work styles to make up a successful workplace, but differences can cause misunderstandings and conflict on the job. To stay productive and professional, you have to learn to handle these differences. Rebecca Thorman, author of the “Kontrary” blog, has five strategies to help you do just that.

PowerPoint 2010 provides a multitude of options when including photographs in your presentations. Begin experimenting by going to the Insert tab, Images group, and click the picture icon. A good example to practice on is one from the Sample Pictures called Tulips.

If your organization has a leadership development program, there’s no reason to keep it shrouded in mystery. A lack of transparency about the program’s structure and selection process can stoke confusion and jealousy among would-be participants.
If you’re sued, how much will you have to pay? If your case has just one plaintiff and no “horrible facts” that would make a jury cringe, expect to pay between $0 and $50,000. If you have lots of plaintiffs and super-horrible facts, expect to pay more than $1 million …

If you want to get the most for your money when booking meeting or event space, you need to negotiate, says Anthony Coyle-Dowling. Don’t just accept the price you’ve always paid for the place you usually use or take the first price you’re quoted at a new location.

An eleventh-hour compromise in Congress pulled the nation back from the brink of the fiscal cliff—at least for the time being—with passage of the “American Taxpayer Relief Act." Here’s a roundup of 16 key tax-saving opportunities in the new law.