The HR Specialist

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HR Law 101: In recent years, employer attempts to regulate what employees may do on their own time have become contentious. Many employers fear that their employees’ off-duty actions, including moonlighting, may reflect badly on them, lower productivity or, even worse, create liability …

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Employee Theft

by The HR Specialist on March 6, 2007 12:00am

in Human Resources

HR Law 101: Employee theft costs U.S. businesses $40 billion every year, according to estimates by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. And internal theft contributes to the failure of one in 10 U.S. businesses annually. That’s why it’s imperative for your organization to have a clearly defined anti-theft policy…

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HR Law 101: Workers’ compensation insurance provides compensation to employees who are injured or disabled on the job. It pays for medical treatment, loss of wages during a period of disability and compensation for permanent disability or disfigurement …

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HR Law 101: If your organization becomes the target of a union-organizing effort, keep your head. Some activities can spell disaster. Both the NLRA and the Taft-Hartley Act prohibit employers from discriminating against employees for participating in union activities ...

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Q. We’re planning to demote an employee for performance reasons. He’d move from a supervisory job (salaried/exempt) to an hourly job, so we’d cut his pay by about $10,000 a year. What kind of notice must we give him regarding the pay cut and exemption status? —L.K., Missouri

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Q. Is our company required to provide a couch or cot on the premises in the event that an employee becomes ill? Are there any laws that dictate safety or health reasons for doing this? —V.A., Ohio

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Q. Our company routinely runs background checks on all people to whom we offer positions. Can we legally disclose an employee’s background information to a customer who requests it? (The employee is working on the customer’s job site.) —L.B., North Carolina

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Q. Are there any legal restrictions on whether we can interview and hire a relative of one of our current employees? —J.D., North Carolina

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Q. One of our employees constantly twists everything I say around to make the situation seem worse than it is. For example, when I put her paycheck on the counter because she was doing something, she told others that I threw it at her. She has lied about many incidents. I have spoken with her several times and indicated that her actions are unprofessional and disrespectful. This is not good for my reputation. I need a solution. —S.W., Texas

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