The HR Specialist

Q. Does Georgia law require employers to provide separation notices to employees who voluntarily resign from their jobs? …

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California employers can rest easy—they aren’t liable for criminal acts their employees may undertake outside the workplace or their job responsibilities. That’s true even if the employee uses work-related materials to commit the crime, and the employer missed important clues in a background check …

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Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act outlaws retaliation against applicants or employees because they have filed EEOC complaints or participated in EEOC proceedings. But that prohibition applies equally to EEOC complaints that job applicants may have filed against other employers. In other words, “blacklisting” an applicant because you know she filed an EEOC complaint against another employer is illegal retaliation …

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Q. We’ve heard that a new law changes how we use Social Security numbers in the workplace. Is that true? …

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Q. Our company’s vacation policy provides that once an employee earns 240 hours (or 30 days) of vacation, no additional vacation may be accrued until the balance falls below that level. Is this legal? …

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Q. We operate a labor-intensive factory that requires workers to remain at their stations throughout most of the workday. Is it legal to require workers to use their 10-minute rest period to use the restroom? …

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Q. We employ nearly 100 employees at a facility in San Jose. What type of notice must we provide if we are planning to lay off more than half of these employees during the first quarter of next year? …

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Are you prepared for the coming crackdown? Have you taken the necessary steps to stay in compliance?

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Employees who can’t tell their employers they have serious health conditions may still put their employers on notice—and trigger their FMLA rights. “Unusual” behavior alone can be enough to notify a reasonable employer that an employee may have a serious health condition. That unusual behavior can include shouting at a supervisor, a panic reaction or other sudden emotional outbursts …

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Have you stressed to supervisors and managers that they shouldn’t let an employee’s promotion paperwork sit on their desks for weeks at a time? If not, do it now. Here’s why: Sitting on a promotion can be an adverse employment action …

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