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Managing People at Work

More than 60 years ago, managers at Toyota, the Japanese car company, devised an ingeniously simple technique, later known as the “Five Whys”, to fix problems in its manufacturing process. The same approach can help you lead teams to identify solutions.

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When you address a roomful of VIPs, watch your nerves. Don’t fight the jitters by trying too hard. That can cause you to butter up bigwigs insincerely and praise them repeatedly.

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If you keep adding task after task to the point where your duties expand like a monstrous blob, you’re in trouble. The resulting complexity can immobilize even the most organized executive.

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Two years after Stephen P. Kaufman joined Arrowhead Electronics, he sought to improve the company’s inventory management system. Outside consultants recommended changes … that backfired.

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There’s no single secret to managing people. But two irreplaceable rules of smart supervision come close: Keep things simple and stoke employees’ loyalty.

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Gus, a director at a natural gas utility firm in the Northeast, discusses his attempt to preserve morale amid a series of companywide reorganizations.

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Using humor in your business presentation is not for you to fancy yourself as a comedy club headliner. The goals of humor are to engage your audience and reinforce your point.

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After you make an embarrassing error at work, the real test is how you respond.

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One of the most endearing traits of a good manager is a willingness to ask for feedback from peers and employees.

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Run collaborative meetings that engage people … Keep to-do lists to manage time better … Enhance training by assigning experiments.

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