Managing People at Work

Sometimes, even our most talented employees meet with failure. Here are five steps to take to keep productivity humming.

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“Erica’s been cutting out early every Friday,” comes the whisper in the break room. Managers don’t have time for this sort of pettiness—here’s what to do about it.

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How do you get peak performance out of employees working in jobs they think aren’t worth their time? Here are some tips to consider.

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We’re all striving to be better communicators, or at least we should be. With that in mind, let’s eliminate the following phrases from our spoken and written communication.

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Swearing doesn’t have to result in co-worker harassment or poor public relations in order for you to send out a cease-and-desist order. If you think someone’s language is a workplace problem, that’s all the justification you need to act.

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To get the information you really need to do your job well, you have to listen—not just “hear,” but really listen. How’s your approach to active listening? Take this quiz and find out:

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All managers form opinions of their team members, just as teachers assess their students. And those opinions tend to stick. But problems erupt when you mark certain employees as “bad” or “unreliable” or “scatterbrained.”

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You may think only movie stars, talk show hosts and hotshot trial lawyers have charisma. But anyone can radiate the kind of energy that generates awe and respect in others.

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You give a series of sterling evaluations to one of your employees and she suddenly asks, “If I’m so good, why is it that I’m never considered for promotion?” Which of these choices is the best way to respond?

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When employees face a serious problem, you want them to open up to you. But what you do is almost as important as what you say.

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