Managing People at Work

Errors slow productivity and frustrate everyone. So it’s tempting to chastise or terminate employees who repeatedly make mistakes. But don’t be so quick with that trigger finger.

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Many people hide their feelings out of anger, fear or uncertainty. So a manager needs to have his or her radar up when an employee says one thing and thinks or does another.

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From time to time, all managers deal with subpar performance or shoddy work. And sometimes it’s tempting just to do it yourself. Don’t.

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So, you have a perfectly functional workplace where things are getting done adequately—but the office has become one of those too-quiet places where you can drop a dime on the carpet and hear it echo up and down the hallway.

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The little things we say—or don’t say—can make a big difference in employee morale and productivity. Which of these do you use, or don’t use?

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A “written warning” is usually a key step in the process of progressive discipline. It’s purpose, of course, is to effect a change in behavior. But how do you write one?

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As a manager, it’s your responsibility to ensure that none of your people behave in a way that diminishes the sense of mutual respect and dignity in your unit. That’s what insensitive racial remarks do.

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Pulling a group of people to­­gether at the last minute (something all managers run into from time to time) presents a number of challenges.

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When we think of success, it’s tempting to focus on the big events or the lucky breaks that change a career. But the daily habits of effective supervision make the difference.

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Regardless of how you orient new employees, you should pair those workers with “buddies” on your team who can help new people find their feet. How do you know who to pair up with whom?

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