Managing People at Work

One difference between successful supervisors and the ones who find their jobs exasperating is how well they inspire their employees.

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A single uncooperative person can throw a whole team out of synch, particularly when you’re facing rapidly changing demands and opportunities.

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Six tips to getting more from your staff.

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You just welcomed a new employee to the team. Whoa! Don’t just walk away just because you did such stellar work on the hiring end.

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Errors slow productivity and frustrate everyone. So it’s tempting to chastise or terminate employees who repeatedly make mistakes. But don’t be so quick with that trigger finger.

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Many people hide their feelings out of anger, fear or uncertainty. So a manager needs to have his or her radar up when an employee says one thing and thinks or does another.

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From time to time, all managers deal with subpar performance or shoddy work. And sometimes it’s tempting just to do it yourself. Don’t.

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So, you have a perfectly functional workplace where things are getting done adequately—but the office has become one of those too-quiet places where you can drop a dime on the carpet and hear it echo up and down the hallway.

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The little things we say—or don’t say—can make a big difference in employee morale and productivity. Which of these do you use, or don’t use?

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A “written warning” is usually a key step in the process of progressive discipline. It’s purpose, of course, is to effect a change in behavior. But how do you write one?

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