Managing People at Work

Even in workplaces where casual dress is the norm, managers and leaders wonder whether they should be dressing differently—that is, better—than their team members. Here are some points to consider:

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You’re the operations supervisor of a plant in a rural area where people know each other well, and you and your people enjoy the friendly atmosphere that prevails on the plant floor. The problem is, some people have been taking advantage of that atmosphere. And they aren’t even employees …

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Experts say that reports of conflict between older workers and younger managers are greatly exaggerated—but generation gaps do create issues that both sides need to address. Here are some questions to ask:

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In the wake of corporate scandals, many enterprises have beefed up their ethics programs. But managers are now reporting cases of ethical overkill—employees blowing the whistle in every case where they think policies might have been violated.

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We’ve all dealt with office martyrs who choose to do things the hard way. They put in long hours and much labor on simple tasks that could be handled quickly.This sort of game can be a real drag on your team’s productivity and morale. Try the following strategies for making your team a martyr-free zone.

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How do you use your skills and role as a manager to help the team achieve success? Well, it likely depends on how you, personally, define success.

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As a manager, you need to orient new hires by pointing them toward success and letting them know how to get there. Something this important shouldn’t go unplanned. Some basics:

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“I have concluded that any organization in any industry … can become an exemplary employer,” writes Robert Levering of the Great Place to Work Institute, which authors the Fortune “100 Best Companies to Work For” list.

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There’s no better way to find out how well your team is performing (and whether you’re getting better or worse) than by asking the people you serve. Whether these customers are inside or outside the organization, they can provide more important information than any other possible source.

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It’s not that hard for an apparently solid team to break apart into a collection of cliques. Here’s how you can stop this problem before it starts:

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