Manager's Legal Bulletin

Maybe their smiles were hiding the discontent. But according to a lawsuit filed against the NFL’s Oakland Raiders, current and former Raiderettes were paid only $1,250 per season—about $5 an hour for the work they performed, which included game-day cheerleading, re­hearsing and appearing at special events.

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More fathers have been filing em­­ployment lawsuits than ever before, particularly under the FMLA. So it’s essential to avoid relying on outdated gender stereotypes and to treat male caregivers fairly. Here are some traps the EEOC warns em­­ployers to watch out for.

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A New Jersey Lexus dealership stuck to its strict dress code policy and re­­fused to hire a man whose Sikh faith required him to wear a beard, uncut hair and a turban. The EEOC sued, and the dealership will pay $50,000 to settle the discrimination suit.

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Can you predict how a potential job candidate will behave as an em­­ployee by the color of his or her clothes? CareerBuilder recently surveyed employers to get their opinions on what they see in the tones of the threads.

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“Do you have any health problems?” That was one question a Con­­nec­­ti­­cut grocery store asked on its job applications. Such questions are disability-related and violate the Americans with Dis­­abilities Act.

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The EEOC sued a Munice, Ind., Dollar General retailer on a dyslexic employee’s behalf and won a $47,500 settlement. The employee had asked for help reading during a mandatory test that followed computer-based training, but his request was denied.

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Take this quiz to see how your hiring skills measure up when it comes to handling pre- and post-interview problems associated with résumés and references.

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If an employee complains that a co-worker’s perfume is aggravating her allergies, you had better act on it or the scent of a lawsuit will soon begin to fill the room.

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A veteran nurse in a Tampa Bay-area hospital had been using a walking cane without incident for about two years when the hospital decided that she could no longer use it because, it said, the cane was unsafe and could be used as a weapon. The EEOC is suing the hospital on the woman’s behalf.

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As the holiday season nears, so begin the inevitable questions from employees regarding holiday pay issues. Misconceptions abound, with employees mistakenly believing they are entitled to much more than they really are.

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