Kevin Eikenberry

Ask my team and they will tell you I am full of (too many?) new ideas, and ask me and I will tell you that we don’t always innovate as much as I would like. Thinking about this paradox on a flight yesterday led me to look squarely at me. After all, if we aren’t innovating as much or as effectively as I’d like, the burden of changing that starts with me.

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The starting point for creating a great organizational attitude starts with what we are thinking about most of the time, because that literally starts the chain reaction. More directly, let’s talk about how we can manage what we think about—and that all starts with what we feed our minds.

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It happened again this week. I was leading a workshop with leaders across an organization and the question came up about attitude. Specifically, I was asked several questions that, paraphrased, were basically this: I have some attitude issues on my team — how can I improve the attitude of my team?

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Last week, I gave you a metaphor to consider—the idea that we romance clients or customers to get them (like a first few dates), but after they are clients we tend to focus less attention on them (like 10 years after the wedding). If you want to avoid this tendency—both personally and organizationally—here are five ideas to get you started.

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I’ve been married nearly 27 years, but I have a (vague) memory of the courtship process. You identify someone you would like to attract (we’ll call them a prospect) and begin selling. You work hard to be noticed, you let them know you are interested, you build a strategy for making a sale — and then if all goes well, you have a date.

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Today I have three morsels for you as a coach. These come from different places, and all of them are valuable. While you could consider this a coaching buffet, allowing you to pick what you like from the list, I’d rather you consider it a three course meal — where you sample and benefit from each of the items.

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When this subject comes up in training and coaching leaders, here is the most common question I get: “How can I convince my people to give better customer service?” The answer may not be as hard as you think.

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We learn in lots of ways and there are lots of tools that can be a part of our overall learning strategy—whether we are thinking about that personally or for our organization. All of these tools have pros and cons—and our job is to figure out the situation we have in front of us, and which tool is the best one for that situation. Let’s explore where the webinar fits into that schema.

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I’m a big (especially college) basketball fan, and so right now is a good time to be alive. I recently wrote on my blog about five coaching lessons we can learn from watching basketball, but today, with 16 teams left, I want to share two major lessons about coaching approaches that you can learn when you turn on the game.

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National pride, pride in your company, pride in your products, pride in your children, pride in your team, pride in self. These are things we think about in a positive light. Yet we also know that same pride can get in our way too. Let’s put this dichotomy, this paradox, into perspective with a couple of real life situations.

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