Jonathan Hyman

Q. Can our employee take FMLA leave without first giving us notice that she needs leave?

{ 0 comments }

Q. Our company maintains an affirmative action plan. I’m concerned, however, that if we refuse to hire a white applicant because of the plan, that person might be able to sue us for discrimination. Yet, if we don’t follow the plan, minority applicants can sue us. It seems like a Catch-22. What do we do?

{ 0 comments }

Q. I own a themed restaurant where some employees dress in costumes to entertain the children. Last week, an employee complained that a “regular” grabbed her breasts through her mouse costume. Am I correct that I don’t have any responsibility because the groper wasn’t one of my employees?

{ 0 comments }

If I had to boil employment law into one overarching maxim, it would be this: Be fair and document everything, in case someone thinks you’re not being fair. If you doubt the importance of thorough documentation, consider two recent cases decided by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals.

{ 0 comments }

Q. Despite the recession, my business is going gangbusters. Instead of having to lay off people, I’m in the position of having to schedule lots of overtime. I have one employee, though, who is balking at having to work more than 40 hours a week. He’s really hurting my production. Do I have any recourse against this employee for refusing overtime?

{ 0 comments }

If an employee’s FMLA medical certification is incomplete (required information is omitted) or insufficient (the information provided is vague, ambiguous or nonresponsive), an employer is now entitled to request additional information directly from the employee’s health care provider, subject to certain key limitations.

{ 0 comments }

Q. We have an employee whom we have classified as exempt, but wants to be classified as nonexempt and earn overtime. Frankly, she’s become a pain about the whole thing. Can we just fire her?

{ 0 comments }

Employers have to meet thresholds before they’re required to comply with most statutes. For example, the FMLA applies only to organizations that employ 50 or more employees within 75 miles. But smaller employers can effectively render themselves covered by the FMLA if they make certain representations about FMLA coverage to their employees. If they say the FMLA applies, then it does. That’s commonly referred to as coverage-by-estoppel.

{ 0 comments }

Q. One of my employees has informed me that she is about to begin undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments. She requested some intermittent time off from work. Am I required to grant her request?

{ 0 comments }

Q. We provide a perfect-attendance bonus to any employee who is not absent or tardy during the calendar year. If an employee’s only missed time is for a medical leave of absence, does the FMLA require us to nevertheless provide the perfect-attendance bonus?

{ 0 comments }

Page 10 of 15« First...91011...Last »