The HR Specialist: Texas Employment Law

Government employees in Texas are protected from retaliation for blowing the whistle on a co-worker, supervisor or the agency where they work.

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A federal magistrate has ordered notifications sent to a large group of employees inviting them to join in a Fair Labor Standards Act lawsuit.

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Here’s a reminder that even doing the right thing can mean a lawsuit.

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Workers at Citgo’s Corpus Christi plant will receive a little more pay following a U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division investigation of the oil company’s shift-change policy.

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Before you decide to terminate em­­ployees for budgetary reasons, make sure you are prepared to justify that rationale. Otherwise—and especially if you provide other reasons later—your motivation may look suspect if the employee sues.

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Don’t make the mistake of thinking that just because an employee is paid a salary, he or she is exempt. The employer must also show that the worker performed exempt work under one of the several exemptions available under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

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Taqueria La Herradura in Pharr, Texas, has paid more than $33,000 in damages to its kitchen staff following a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation.

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A woman fired from a Children’s Lighthouse Learning Center franchise in Katy, Texas, is suing her former employer after refusing to address a transgender child as a male.

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Here’s a rather novel question being answered for the first time in the 5th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over Texas employers. Can the refusal to accept a request to rescind a resignation ever be an adverse em­­ployment action and retaliation for engaging in protected activity?

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Employees who get promotions generally don’t sue their employers, but an administrative specialist for the city of Austin, Texas, has done just that.

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