The HR Specialist: Pennsylvania Employment Law

Employees who report being threatened at work can quit and collect unemployment benefits if their em­­ployer doesn’t act fast to provide a safe workplace. Such a “compelling and necessitous” reason to quit makes the employee eligible.

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An attorney who once worked for Valley Forge, Pa.-based investment firm Vanguard claims the company charges its affiliates artificially low management fees, which illegally reduces its own tax burden.

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A Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen franchisee in Chester County faces an EEOC lawsuit for allegedly refusing to hire three applicants because of their age.

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You may have heard that employees have new opportunities to sue their employers based on local laws that expand employment protections and prohibit forms of discrimination that state or federal laws don’t include. Sometimes, that’s true. Fortunately, though, these new laws and their regulations may trip up employees and give you an opportunity to push for the case to be dismissed, as this recent case shows.

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Some employees seem to think that if they are approved for FMLA leave, their employers have to accept their time off as legitimate. That’s true to a point. But it doesn’t mean employers can’t ferret out leave abuse if they have reason to believe the employee isn’t being honest.

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A federal court has refused to expand common law workplace protection for victims of domestic abuse.

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The 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over Penn­­sylvania employers, has ruled that paying an hourly rate for temporary employees coming from an outside agency may mean those workers are your “employees” under anti-­discrimination laws.

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The EEOC has filed suit against staffing company Labor Ready Mid-Atlantic for actions occurring at its office in Washington, Pa.

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A mining company’s refusal to accommodate an employee’s religious belief has cost it $586,860. A federal jury in Pittsburgh decided that Consol Energy violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act when it refused an employee’s request to use an alternative method for tracking his hours.

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A former professor at the University of Scranton has sued the university claiming it denied him tenure and fired him because of his Greek heritage.

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