The HR Specialist: Pennsylvania Employment Law

You can’t refuse to hire someone just because they previously sued you for disability discrimination. Saying so up-front just about guarantees that you will be sued.

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The ADA protects disabled applicants and employees from discrimination based on disability and requires employers to reasonably accommodate known disabilities.

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Public employers have a special Constitutional responsibility that private-sector employers don’t have.

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Have some of your employees been promoted without getting raises? That could be dangerous if those workers can show that other employees outside their protected class did get higher pay.

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A federal court has refused to expand possible reasons for employment lawsuits to include so-called “bullying” claims.

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One of the easiest ways to get in legal trouble is to discipline two employees differently for breaking the same rule.

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Here’s a common sense conclusion: Firing someone you suspect may be a racist is a legitimate decision.

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Here’s a bit of good news that may prevent a big jury verdict: An employment-related whistleblower claim must be heard and decided by a judge, not a jury.

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An attorney with long experience working for Pennsylvania state agencies has filed an EEOC complaint alleging that the state’s Office of Open Records refused to hire him because of his age.

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Employees who report being threatened at work can quit and collect unemployment benefits if their em­­ployer doesn’t act fast to provide a safe workplace. Such a “compelling and necessitous” reason to quit makes the employee eligible.

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