The HR Specialist: New York Employment Law

CVS Caremark Corp. was fined $226,000 by the U.S. Labor Department for changing employee timecards and violating child labor laws. The department found 43 violations at stores in New York and six other states …

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New York is one of 29 states that have signed memoranda of understanding with the IRS to share enforcement information on employment tax collection matters. The move is part of the IRS’ Questionable Employment Tax Practices initiative …

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Many employers have strict policies on giving references for current or former employees seeking other jobs: Keep it simple—dates of employment, positions held and pay rates. But sometimes supervisors supply glowing recommendations anyway. They need to know that if they do, they had better be willing to stick with the accolades, even if their relationships with the employees change …

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Good news for public school employers: Employees who allege they have been discriminated against under the New York Executive Law have just one year to start litigation—as specified in the New York Education Law. Most other employees have three years to mull over their lawsuit options …

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Charlene Morisseau, a litigation associate in DLA Piper’s New York City office, lost a $250 million race discrimination lawsuit against the law firm. Morisseau joined the firm in 2003 and was fired in less than a year …

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A former recruiter for K-Sea Transportation of Staten Island is suing the company for $16 million, claiming it failed to address her sexual harassment complaints …

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Fourteen black employees of 180 Connect, a Farmingdale cable television contractor, have filed a lawsuit over a 2006 incident in which a supervisor hung a 15-foot noose in a warehouse. Although the EEOC investigated and eventually dismissed charges brought against the company, the suit alleges the noose was part of a campaign of harassment against black workers …

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Conventional wisdom has been that isolated or “stray” remarks alone by an employer do not prove discriminatory intent. Conventional wisdom may be wrong. A recent 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals case (Tomassi v. Insignia Financial Group, Inc., 478 F.3d 111, 2007) has clarified what it deemed a misconception of the true meaning of the term “stray remarks”  …

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The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires employers to compensate employees for any time spent on the job that benefits the employer. There are, however, some exceptions. For example, if employees use their own time to study materials that will qualify them for promotions, that time generally doesn’t have to be paid …

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Former HarperCollins book publisher and celebrity biographer Judith Regan has filed a $100 million lawsuit claiming a senior executive at News Corp. in 2004 encouraged her to lie to federal investigators about her past affair with former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik …

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