The HR Specialist: New York Employment Law

Age bias has no place in the workplace, and managers are primarily in charge of preventing it. Warn them against making any statements that may indicate management or your organization prefers younger employees to older ones.

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Miron Berenshteyn, a former computer programmer for Lehman Brothers in Jersey City, has filed a $5 million lawsuit alleging the company violated the federal and New Jersey WARN acts when it laid off more than 100 workers in September.

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If your business depends on solid client relationships, now is the time to safeguard those relationships with a restrictive covenant that prevents employees from jumping ship and taking customers with them.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to review a reverse discrimination ruling by the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which had upheld a lower court’s decision that the city of New Haven, Conn., could refuse to certify the results of two fire department promotion exams…

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According to a forecast by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, New York City will lead the nation in job losses in 2009. The Big Apple is expected to lose about 181,000 jobs this year—most of which can be attributed to the collapse of the city’s financial sector.

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Watch out if you ever fine employees, force them to pay others to perform work they can’t finish or make them provide their own equipment. Those expenses may cause them to earn less than the minimum wage.

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Employees who work in a union setting often cannot take temporary assignments into management without losing the benefits of their union membership. One such benefit is often seniority. Employees must sue right away if they lose seniority.

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Three former detectives for the Nassau County Police Department’s 8th Precinct in Levittown have won a $1 million verdict for sexual harassment and discrimination.

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Rachel Love, erstwhile patron of Johnny Utah’s in Rockefeller Center, is suing the restaurant for allowing an inebriated individual (herself) to ride a mechanical bull, leading to injuries.

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Dulzia Burchette, a black former saleswoman for Abercrombie & Fitch, is suing the company, claiming racial discrimination and harassment. Burchette says she was harassed when she came to work at the company’s Fifth Avenue store with blonde highlights in her hair.

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