The HR Specialist: New York Employment Law

The Fair Labor Standards Act is an unforgiving master—you’ll pay if you misclassify an employee without solid, good-faith reasons. Hourly employees that you incorrectly designate as exempt will collect more than time-and-a-half for the overtime they worked

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The EEOC has recently stepped up efforts to combat national-origin discrimination. Because the agency had concluded that speaking another primary language such as Spanish may disadvantage some employees, it’s pushing for a tight limit to when employers can enforce so-called English-only rules

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Watch out! If you are involved—even in a small way—in any activity that leads to a discrimination claim, you may be personally liable …

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If an employee dies in your workplace, take note: Under New York’s Workers’ Compensation Law, any death that occurs at work is presumed to be related to work …

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New York’s unemployment compensation law, like that of many other states, provides temporary payments to employees who lose their jobs through no fault of their own. The law is complex and in some cases holds an employer liable for unemployment insurance (UI) payments even when a former employee wasn’t fired but quit …

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New York’s workers’ compensation system is designed to protect employees who are injured on the job by replacing lost wages while they recover. The New York State Workers’ Compensation Board (www.wcb.state.ny.us/) administers the law …

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New York employers must contend with an assortment of leave laws in addition to those required by the federal FMLA and the ADA’s reasonable accommodations requirements for employees with disabilities …

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Under the New York Human Rights Law (NYHRL), it’s illegal to subject people to differential treatment based on age, race, creed, color, national origin, sexual orientation, military status, sex, disability, predisposing genetic characteristics or marital status …

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 As of Jan. 1, 2007, the minimum wage in New York state is $7.15. The Division of Labor Standards in the state Department of Labor administers the law …

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If you employ at least one worker for 30 days during the calendar year, you must comply with the New York Disability Benefits Law. Coverage starts four weeks after the 30th day …

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