• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

The HR Specialist: North Carolina Employment Law

You’ve told managers before, now tell ’em again: Email may seem like private communication, but it really isn’t. Anything a manager says in an email may become evidence in a lawsuit.

{ 0 comments }

An administrative law judge has ruled that Norfolk Southern Rail­way must pay a former employee $122,199 in compensatory and punitive damages after it violated the worker’s rights under whistle-blower provisions of the Federal Railway Safety Act.

{ 0 comments }

Lawrence Transportation has reached a settlement with a job applicant whom it refused to hire unless he cut off his dreadlocks. In addition to an undisclosed payment, the company agreed to implement and enforce policies banning religious discrimination and provide anti-­discrimination training to all employees.

{ 0 comments }

Here’s a worry for employers facing sexual harassment charges: If the EEOC decides to take up the case, it can expand the charges to include employees who never actually complained about the harassment and aren’t even around anymore.

{ 0 comments }

When the North Carolina Legislature saw fit to enact the North Carolina Equal Employment Practices Act (NCEEPA), it didn’t go the extra step and authorize individual employee lawsuits to enforce those rights. Instead, the law is just a declaration that discrimination prohibited by federal law also violates public policy.

{ 0 comments }

Here’s a bit of good news for employers on the losing end of an EEOC determination that an employee’s discrimination complaint has merit: That determination isn’t the final word—and it doesn’t carry much weight in court. The employee won’t be able to use the determination to prove bias.

{ 0 comments }

Don’t let down your guard just because an employee’s discrimination complaint lacks merit. He could still have a legitimate retaliation claim. Simply put, if a supervisor punishes an employee after he complains about discrimination, you can still be found liable even if there was no discrimination in the first place.

{ 0 comments }

If you want a job, you have to apply for it. If you want a promotion, you have to apply for it. If you want to sue an employer for discrimination in hiring or promotions, you probably should have applied, too, right?

{ 0 comments }

Some employees expect the workplace to be a perfect place, free of all strife and disharmony. Too bad that’s an unrealistic standard. Employees have to develop some degree of tolerance for slights and inconveniences. And even if callous supervisors and co-workers treat sensitive souls badly, that doesn’t mean discrimination is to blame.

{ 0 comments }

When the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) cited the owners of a Caldwell County gran­ite mine for 103 safety violations, the company didn’t contest the resulting fines. But they didn’t pay them either, and now the MSHA is suing to collect.

{ 0 comments }

Page 30 of 81« First...1020293031405060...Last »