The HR Specialist: Minnesota Employment Law

Disabled employees who have medical needs that require a reasonable accommodation and don’t receive one can quit and still be eligible to receive unemployment benefits.

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The rules that govern employee efforts to better their working conditions are complex.

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An employee who had a state interference-with-contract claim dismissed—the court said he had been legitimately fired for insubordination—can still file a federal whistleblower retaliation lawsuit based on the same facts.

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They’ve become an important medium for getting work done, so you need a policy that covers how they’re used.

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You must provide all employees easy access to their pay records. It’s not enough to tell workers they can log in from a computer at home or elsewhere. Give them a place at work where they can easily and quickly check their pay.

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Employers have the right to set reasonable behavioral expectations for employees. This, of course, includes expecting that employees won’t sexually, or otherwise, harass employees. Feel free to make your anti-harassment policy as strict as you want.

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If managers somehow collude to discriminate against an employee, that may be grounds for a conspiracy lawsuit. It happened in a recent case.

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It usually happens like this: An employee comes to HR complaining that her boss said something inappropriate—maybe it was a sexually explicit joke, racial slur or offensive comment about someone’s religion. Then the supervisor gets angry at the employee for complaining and retaliates.

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No state has passed a law that outright bans bullying at work, and only one has come close. Yet don’t let that stop you from forging ahead with your own anti-bullying program.

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A Saint Louis Park, Minn., orthodontist has learned the hard way that you can’t offer a job but then rescind it when you learn your new hire is pregnant.

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