The HR Specialist: Minnesota Employment Law

The Minnesota state legislature is considering outlawing virtually all cellphone use behind the wheel.

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With paid sick leave ordinances set to take effect July 1 in both Minneapolis and St. Paul, the Minnesota state legislature is firing back.

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Whenever you fire someone, consider that he or she might sue you. Be prepared to show that the employee’s punishment was comparable to that of other employees who broke the same rule.

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A federal court has concluded that Minnesota’s sex discrimination laws include gender identity as a protected status.

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What should happen if a physical altercation in the workplace ends with one employee securing a restraining order against the other? Can you fire the apparent instigator for breaking workplace rules against fighting? Will that expose you to liability?

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An important reminder: Willful misconduct can bar a former employee from receiving unemployment benefits.

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Employees caught lying on their employment applications about their educational level may not be entitled to unemployment compensation benefits.

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Summit Brewing in St. Paul is suing its former vice president of sales for providing trade secrets to a direct competitor.

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The psychological test the Minneapolis Police Department uses to screen applicants is biased against minorities, according to some police officers.

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If customers or visitors becomes belligerent, a business can ban them from the premises without running afoul of disability discrimination laws.

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