The HR Specialist: Minnesota Employment Law

Employees caught lying on their employment applications about their educational level may not be entitled to unemployment compensation benefits.

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Summit Brewing in St. Paul is suing its former vice president of sales for providing trade secrets to a direct competitor.

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The psychological test the Minneapolis Police Department uses to screen applicants is biased against minorities, according to some police officers.

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If customers or visitors becomes belligerent, a business can ban them from the premises without running afoul of disability discrimination laws.

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Think twice before terminating a worker who has earned consistently good performance reviews.

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If an employee comes forward and requests a work-related accommodation, refusing to make that accommodation may mean the employee becomes eligible for unemployment.

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State unemployment officials and courts are much more likely to be persuaded by a detailed record than the worker’s mere assertion that she was doing her job just fine.

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Employers have to let workers raise concerns about safety and other workplace problems. However, they don’t have to put up with incessant arguing in the workplace.

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A Hennepin County, Minn. jury has awarded two Richmond police officers $125,000 after determining that the city discriminated against them because of their age.

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Minneapolis-based Ameriprise Financial has agreed to pay $128,200 in back wages and interest to 20 black current and former employees to settle federal discrimination charges.

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