The HR Specialist: California Employment Law — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 2
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

The HR Specialist: California Employment Law

A.B. 1008, a bill currently before the California legislature, would bar employers from asking about an applicant’s criminal history before making a conditional job offer.

{ 0 comments }

It’s not an ADA violation to refuse to hire someone who obviously can’t meet the physical requirements for performing a job.

{ 0 comments }

Make absolutely certain that you retain copies of all interview questions and notes. You may need them to prove how you made hiring decisions.

{ 0 comments }

Employers face liability if they spot racial harassment at work and don’t take reasonable steps to stop it. Don’t assume the problem will go away on its own—or that workers who experience harassment will indefinitely tolerate a hostile environment.

{ 0 comments }

Beware making exceptions to the rules. That can look like discrimination if a disgruntled employee who doesn’t receive the same exception spots a pattern suggesting unfair favoritism.

{ 0 comments }

A federal court in California has opened the door for mentally disabled employees seeking accommodations to request a transfer away from specific locations and individuals.

{ 0 comments }

Employers should proceed with caution when using criminal histories to make employment decisions.

{ 0 comments }

Here’s a cautionary tale for employers tempted to create a “make work” accommodation designed to drive a disabled worker to quit. Courts are likely to take a dim view of such a cynical strategy.

{ 0 comments }

Ignoring a request for accommodations may give the employee grounds for a lawsuit, even if it turns out that an accommodation wasn’t required.

{ 0 comments }

The California minimum wage increased on Jan. 1 to $10.50 per hour for businesses employing 26 or more employees.

{ 0 comments }

Page 2 of 126123...102030...Last »