The HR Specialist: California Employment Law

SB 1360, passed late in 2014, requires employers to pay employees for recovery periods taken during hot weather.

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The California state legislature made changes to both CalOSHA reporting requirements and fines for violations.

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When faced with negative reviews and worried about losing their jobs, some employees file internal discrimination complaints in an effort to avoid discipline. Don’t play that game!

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One of President Obama’s attempts to stimulate the economy has been nixed by a federal court.

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High-profile lawyer Mark Geragos has set his sights on Web-based real estate company Zillow.com. His firm has filed four lawsuits against the company for various federal law violations. In the two most recent suits, Gera­­gos represents a woman who claims she was the victim of age discrimination and another who alleges severe sexual harassment.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has refused to review the California Supreme Court Decision in which the state’s highest court ruled that the Federal Arbitration Act preempted California’s policy against enforcement of class-action waivers on the grounds that they were contrary to public policy or unconscionable.

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Among the flurry of new California labor laws passed in 2014 is an amendment to the labor code that allows the state Labor Commissioner to issue a civil penalty for failure to pay less than the minimum wage.

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An employee doesn’t become an independent contractor just by signing an agreement that says so. Courts use several tests to make that determination.

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Employers must pay for the time em­­ployees spend sitting at their desks if they aren’t allowed to leave—even if they aren’t doing any work.

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Attention to detail is essential when using arbitration agreements. They are contracts and the ordinary legal requirements for contract formation must be followed.

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