Executive Leadership

Staff members can’t make decisions that fit the organization’s practices without knowing the rules.

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Ockham’s Razor (also known as the “Law of Parsimony”) is a principle
that states that the simplest solution to a problem, not the most
complicated, is always best. Examples:

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If the people at your new job are ridiculously happy to see you, beware. You’ve just inherited a big mess. As early
as the interview stage, you may see warnings. Look for problems like these:

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Over recent decades, the thinking has held that leaders should be
evaluated solely on performance, usually defined as financial
performance. Now, several Harvard researchers say that providing meaning and purpose
for employees is an equally important gauge of leadership.

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You probably think you know your “people people.” They’re the nurturers, the team players, the diplomats. In truth, that ain’t the half of it. Researchers studied the psychological tests of more than 7,000
professionals and identified four aspects of “relational” work:
influence, interpersonal facilitation, relational creativity and team
leadership. Here’s what it means:

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The earlier you face a crisis and make difficult corrections, the better. Just ask Robert Hass, who took over as CEO of Levi Strauss & Co. in 1989.

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How do you hire and keep people who share your mission, work ethic and
what you believe in? When leadership coach and author John C. Maxwell
moved his company from San Diego to Atlanta, he sat his employees down
and went over this starter set of values:

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Ever wondered how leaders lift their people out of a disheartening
situation? Here’s the key: Offer them a reputation they’re proud to
uphold. Example: In June 1940, Great
Britain suffered a defeat to the Nazis at Dunkirk. After that
demoralizing loss,Winston Churchill addressed the House of Commons.
Here’s part of what he said:

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K’ang-hsi, who ruled China from 1661 to 1722, was a formidable leader
who held direct authority over courts, infrastructure, military defense
and nearly everything else in his immense empire. Yet, when it came to judging whether his ministers were doing their jobs, he applied just one yardstick:

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Even if you lack formal authority, you can still practice what business
professor and researcher Robert E. Kelly calls “small-L leadership” by
bringing people together to complete a job.

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