Executive Leadership

Don Seibert put in ungodly hours for the J.C. Penney department store at the start of his career in the 1940s.

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Being soft-spoken doesn’t mean you don’t trot out Mr. Hardball when it counts.

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Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani had been working on a book about leadership for months. Then, within hours of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, Giuliani summoned up these principles:

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Legend had it that even the son of Zeus couldn’t capture the Rock of Aornos near the Indus River in Persia. Everybody considered it impregnable.

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Look for the deeper reasons why people leave your organization. Use these exit-interview questions to smoke out chronic problems:

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What can you learn from Google? To obsess about producing the very best product, and never to become lazy, arrogant, complacent or “evil.” In more concrete language, here’s what that vision statement means:

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Charismatic CEO Carlos Ghosnhas driven Nissan’s historic turnaround with a simple leadership strategy:  State a lofty goal, and expect everyone to meet it.

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New York chef Marcus Samuelsson combined traditional Swedish cooking with ingredients from around the world to create novel dishes that made his restaurant famous.

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“All the first-rate decision-makers I’ve observed had a very simple rule,” says Peter Drucker:  “If you have quick consensus on an important matter, don’t make the decision. Acclamation means nobody has done the homework.”

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What seems impossible is often no more than preconceived notions and “mental models” distorting what we see. Don’t believe it? Check out these examples:

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