Executive Leadership

Janice Bryant Howroyd was the first to integrate her North Carolina high school, where her teacher explained “why Africans were so well-suited to slavery and how we’d be much poorer as a society if we went any further with this affirmative action.”

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Executive coach Cal LeMon tells the following story about superior customer service:

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You give an especially challenging assignment to someone on your staff. Then, everyone else grows envious and angry.

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Until Ben Hogan began his rise to prominence in the 1930s, no professional golfer had ever improved his game so much by watching better players, then adopting their techniques and refining them.

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For about three generations now, IBM has been training fresh batches of leaders straight out of college. Now, Big Blue’s got a brand new bag.


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To bring a company legend to life, former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina created a list of principles invoking the story of how two buddies in a garage started the company.

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Lord knows, leaders have never been models of perfection. Nobody illustrates that point better than Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence author and third U.S. president.

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A snapshot of three leaders across the eight-episode PBS reality series “Colonial House”—in which 21st century participants recreate American colonial life—offers three leadership lessons in miniature:

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William Paley virtually invented mass entertainment after founding CBS, the dominant network through much of television’s history. A few of his approaches:

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Marcus Tullius Cicero, the famous Roman orator born in 3106 B.C., survived decades of political turmoil and lived a long and productive life as one of Rome’s most illustrious citizens. One reason: He cultivated close friends whom he could rely upon for support.

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