Executive Leadership

Former Home Dept chief executive Bob Nardelli exemplifies some of the biggest rules of leadership:

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Angie Morgan and Courtney Lynch were among the only women in their
Marine Corps officer training school. The physical demands were tough,
but commanding men who’d never worked for a woman proved tougher. Morgan and Lynch excelled at it and now, they’re teaching other women.
Their workshops focus on four Marine-centric
ideas:

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When a problem doesn’t respond to solutions that have worked for you before, unlock your creativity with these approaches:

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It would have been easy for helicopter pilot Hugh Thompson Jr. to fly away from the scene of carnage. But he and his crew—appalled when they came upon their fellow U.S.
troops killing civilians in the Vietnamese village of My Lai— landed
their helicopter between the shooting soldiers and fleeing villagers,
pointed their guns at the Americans and told them to stop firing.

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So, can leadership be taught? Jay Conger, executive director of the University of Southern
California’s Leadership Institute, had his doubts. He embarked on a
two-year study to find out.

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Avoid falling prey to the most common lie leaders tell themselves

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Prepare for the next crisis— or opportunity—by employing “active waiting”:

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Short-circuit team paralysis by empowering more people throughout the ranks to make decisions on their own

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Maintain your effectiveness as a leader by resisting the temptation to
flatter people, withhold information, lie or exaggerate past successes

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Encourage “break the mold thinking” by asking team members to interview
10 people outside your organization about the challenges you’re facing

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