Executive Leadership

Most people think the key to being productive is working flat-out 100
percent of the time. Not so, says John Zenger, former chairman of the
Times Mirror Group.

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Gossip gets a bad rap, but it actually helps set norms and lets your
people feel as though they belong. In the process, they’ll also sort
out who’s trustworthy, talented and reliable, and who’s not. So, recognize the power of social ties to sustain your people during crunch times. Here’s what you can do:

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Sam Cooke and “Little Richard” Penniman were about as different as two African-American pop singers could be. As fate would have it, they toured England
together back in the early 1960s. And, when Penniman’s insecurities threatened the tour, it was Cooke who stepped in—quietly—to keep things going.

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Asked if he has a favorite hero from the Bible, noted Holocaust researcher and Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel names Moses. So, what are we supposed to learn from Moses?

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Baseball fans could learn a lot about the game by listening to former
major league manager Tony Pena talk about it. Unfortunately, fans of
the Kansas City Royals never got the chance. But the way that Pena handled the following situation speaks volumes about his philosophy as a leader.

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Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter and Bernie Williams. They’re the only guys who’ve played for the New York Yankees throughout
the team’s dazzling 10-year run featuring six American League
championships and four World Series titles. In a sport where continuity is rare, their friendship reinforces their leadership.

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Former Home Dept chief executive Bob Nardelli exemplifies some of the biggest rules of leadership:

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Angie Morgan and Courtney Lynch were among the only women in their
Marine Corps officer training school. The physical demands were tough,
but commanding men who’d never worked for a woman proved tougher. Morgan and Lynch excelled at it and now, they’re teaching other women.
Their workshops focus on four Marine-centric
ideas:

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When a problem doesn’t respond to solutions that have worked for you before, unlock your creativity with these approaches:

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It would have been easy for helicopter pilot Hugh Thompson Jr. to fly away from the scene of carnage. But he and his crew—appalled when they came upon their fellow U.S.
troops killing civilians in the Vietnamese village of My Lai— landed
their helicopter between the shooting soldiers and fleeing villagers,
pointed their guns at the Americans and told them to stop firing.

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