Executive Leadership

Creativity. It’s a fairly new buzzword in business. Now comes research
from Harvard business professor Teresa Amabile to debunk the myths
about it. For the past eight years, she’s run a diary study of hundreds
of managers “to look at creativity in the wild.” Amabile has uncovered these myths:

{ 0 comments }

The best doesn’t come along too often, but the worst, the mediocre and
the merely OK show up all the time. Thus, recognizing when to say “No”
is more valuable than knowing when to say “Yes.” Eliminate poor choices
quickly, and you save everybody’s time.

{ 0 comments }

Use quick “Got a second?” chats on the fly, rather than lengthy meetings, to stay on top of things.

{ 0 comments }

Determine whether the people you’re considering promoting are ready to break with their current jobs

{ 0 comments }

Resist the temptation to dismiss people with one-word labels

{ 0 comments }

Gain a new perspective on how your organization really operates

{ 0 comments }

“Leadership is not magnetic personality,” says management guru Peter Drucker.

{ 0 comments }

Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo overshadows what is perhaps his biggest leadership gaffe.

{ 0 comments }

Alexander the Great was a motivational genius and maybe the greatest
leader of all time. He knew the names of 10,000 soldiers. He ate, slept
and marched with them, choosing to sleep cold and eat little. Yet, even the great Alexander couldn’t push his people too far.

{ 0 comments }

At many organizations, work groups are creating Web log (“Blog”)-style pages so they can easily communicate about projects.

{ 0 comments }