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Executive Leadership

First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt occasionally found herself embroiled in controversy. Within weeks of decrying the practice of racially segregated seating in Alabama, she intervened in another racial spat.

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Leaders let other people know what they stand for. In other words, they make their values explicit. Here’s how to develop your values and communicate them with conviction:

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Take these three steps to measure your next job offer and make sure your transition runs smoothly:

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The way you use your organization’s parking lot can send important messages about your unvoiced priorities and your leadership style. Here’s what we saw at five organizations:

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When you meet an influential person, learn as much as you can, with this structured timeline approach:

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As a graduate assistant at the University of Tennessee, football coaching prodigy-to-be Jon Gruden found himself passing a note to assistant coach Walt Harris during an important game against Auburn.

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If it ain’t broke, blow it up. That’s the legacy that General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt inherited … so that’s what he’s doing.

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Leaders can say a lot about how much they value their people by undertaking some physical act of labor.

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Dan Wieden launched his advertising career in the basement of a union hall in Portland, Ore., with nothing more than a pay phone and a borrowed typewriter, on which he tapped out a slogan: “Just do it.”

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Negative team members are like poison. Left unchecked, they corrode morale through the ranks. They can take many forms, including:

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