Executive Leadership

Maybe you’d prefer not to compete, compete, compete. That’s what
Alexandra McGilloway decided, so her business model is based on
collaboration and complementary products rather than competition. In 14 years, East West has become the largest spiritual bookstore in
the Northwest. Last year, it took in $1.7 million, about 5 percent more
than in 2003.

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Make it a habit to grill your people about stories in the newspaper.

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View your decisions as a trial judge might:

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Tap into the young minds on your staff

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Ask your vendors to tell you how they can charge you less.

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New findings suggest that close-knit teams are often less competitive than teams in which camaraderie is weak. Sociologists at the University of California and elsewhere see some compelling reasons why friendly teams finish last:

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Harvard University President Lawrence Summers provides a lesson in what
not to do as a leader: alienate your people by telling them they’re
probably not genetically equipped to do their jobs.

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Lorraine Monroe’s life changed when a teacher encouraged her to run for
student office in the fourth grade. That began what was to become
Monroe’s lifelong affinity for leadership roles.

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Steve Demos, who once practiced Buddhism in a cave, started making tofu
in a bathtub and selling it at his tai chi class about 20 years ago. By
2001, his organic food company boasted the nation’s best-selling soy
milk: Silk.

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Anybody can excel at the tasks they love. People who rise to the top also excel at what they don’t love.

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