Executive Leadership

“The secret to creativity,” Albert Einstein once said, “is knowing how to hide your sources.” Case in point: The physicist Galileo Galilei may have built one of his most famous theories on a description from Dante’s Inferno.

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Flush out any micromanagement tendencies you may have by answering these questions:

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Some of the most effective executives never fit the stereotype of a
“leader,” says management guru Peter Drucker. They aren’t charismatic,
and they range from wildly extroverted to reclusive, laid-back to
controlling. What actually makes them effective, he says, is that they all do these seven things:

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Leadership institute founder Lorraine Monroe never launches a new
undertaking without providing her staff with these vital pieces of
information to influence and guide them:

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Darlene Ryan wasn’t looking for any leadership role. A pioneer female
tax partner at Arthur Andersen, she was growing tired of the hi-jinks
in the accounting world and distressed at hardly ever seeing her son.

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Ask these key questions to ferret out exceptional hires:

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About 80 percent of Broadway musicals lose money. Jeffrey B. Seller is trying to change that. The 40-year-old producer of such quirky musicals as Rent and Avenue Q is leading—that is, dragging— Broadway into a new era of ticket pricing based on practices in other industries.

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Choking is a two-part process that can hit whenever the stakes are high: You tell yourself that something will go badly. You then under-perform to ensure that your prediction comes true. How can you stop choking?

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Positive leaders have a way of telling even sob stories in a way that
reveals a silver lining. That’s called a “positive explanatory style.” To develop that style, take these steps:

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Draft your next presentation quickly and easily.

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