Executive Leadership

Apply these two gems of negotiating wisdom from a classic source:

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Even liberals may come to regard the late William Rehnquist as one of the best U.S. Supreme Court chief justices of the century. Reasons: His moderation and efficiency, his fairness and good nature helped him get along with ideological opponents.

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Brush up business-theory basics—from Gantt Charts to Maslow’s Hierarchy.

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Encourage learning and build creativity by explaining the results you’re looking for.

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Protect your laptop at the airport.

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Fear of sexual-harassment suits have forced many American leaders to stop touching people. Yet,
some top executives, including Jack Welch, still include a pat on the
shoulder or a warmer-than-usual handshake among their leadership tools. Here’s how to use the power of touch:

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Stay on top of your responsibilities with this technique from Donald Trump:

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George Washington stood first in the hearts of his countrymen for many reasons. One of them: He treated people right. By the time he was
16, he had copied out the Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation. Here’s a sampling from the book, a code of 110 rules, that Washington often displayed:

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When Pennsbury High School junior class President Bob Costa was asked
to take on a mission—persuade local-but-soon-to-be-national pop star
John Mayer to play the 2003 Pennsbury High junior prom—he agreed.

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The following novels are old, corny and sexist. But they were the most
popular “get ahead” books of their day because they taught effective
lessons about success.

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