Executive Leadership

U.S. business leaders tend to be professional managers with fewer
family and political ties than leaders elsewhere, says one Harvard
business professor who’s studied the issue. Because of this relative
independence from family and politics in business, the research
indicates, Americans use a greater variety of leadership styles. Which one of these describes you?

{ 0 comments }

After assuming command of a ship, Navy Capt. Michael Abrashoff spent his first days simply
observing. He noticed that his young crew was smart, skilled and full
of good ideas. Those ideas usually went nowhere, though, because nobody
in charge ever listened to them. Here’s how aggressive listening helped both Abrashoff and his crew:

{ 0 comments }

Stand out from other execs— who often hide behind e-mail and voice mail

{ 0 comments }

Choose the most reliable job applicants by passing over any who bad-mouth previous employers or bosses.

{ 0 comments }

Survive your biggest setbacks by thinking like Thomas Edison.

{ 0 comments }

By 1810, Napoleon’s occupation of Spain had deteriorated into what he would call his “Spanish ulcer.” With help from England and Portugal, local insurgents resisted more
than 300,000 French soldiers occupying Spain. The rebels managed to
force a French retreat and occupy the hills controlling the roads to
Seville and Cordoba. The division charged down this road in the high sierra, headed straight
for a band of French soldiers commanded by a truly remarkable officer: Capt. Cyr Billot.

{ 0 comments }

When Jim Copeland served as CEO of Deloitte & Touche, now part of
an international professional services firm, the people he worked with
respected him for his trustworthiness. Why?

{ 0 comments }

J.K. Rowling’s boyfriend was moving to Manchester and wanted her to
move, too. During her train trip back to London after a weekend spent
looking for an apartment, the character of Harry Potter simply popped
into her head. There was a glitch, however. Rowling didn’t have a writing utensil.

{ 0 comments }

It’s so easy to lose sight of customers that even good organizations do
it all the time. But a technique called LEO might help you stay a
little closer to them. LEO stands for:

{ 0 comments }

Jimmy Doolittle, one of the great aviation pioneers and a wildly
successful air racer himself, saw the need— and the market—for bigger,
safer planes in the 1930s. So, he tried to convince Shell Oil Co. to produce a standard,
higher-octane fuel for larger planes, which were still in the design
phase. “But Jimmy, this country is in a deep depression,” said Alex Fraser,
vice president of Shell. “You want to spend millions of dollars on a
product with no guarantee of a market.” Doolittle stuck by his guns.

{ 0 comments }