Executive Leadership

Maybe landing on the beach in Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944, is what turned Waverly Woodson from a soldier into a leader. A U.S. Army medic with the all-black 320th Antiaircraft Barrage Balloon
Unit, Woodson arrived near the back of the first landing wave. Ahead of
him, the Germans were mowing men down.

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When your people aren’t doing their best, you have two basic choices:

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Among today’s business animals, says Alexi Venneri, marketing and
communications chief at marketing data firm Who’s Calling, you’ve got
to have BALLS. That means you’ve got to be:

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We all love the whole right brain/left brain thing, but it’s too
simplistic for reality. The truth: Accountants can be creative, too. Take Samuel Insull. This “starched English bean-counter” who took care
of finances, personnel, mergers and day-to-day business for Thomas
Edison, was one of the few people who saw what electric power could do.

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Many organizations like their chief execs to come up through the president and chief operating officer positions. But executive recruiter Gerry Roche (Heidrick & Struggles) sees some flawed thinking there.

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Al Roker wanted to be more than a weatherman, but the NBC meteorologist and Today Show co-host always remembered the advice of his mentor, Willard Scott:

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“The secret to creativity,” Albert Einstein once said, “is knowing how to hide your sources.” Case in point: The physicist Galileo Galilei may have built one of his most famous theories on a description from Dante’s Inferno.

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Flush out any micromanagement tendencies you may have by answering these questions:

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Some of the most effective executives never fit the stereotype of a
“leader,” says management guru Peter Drucker. They aren’t charismatic,
and they range from wildly extroverted to reclusive, laid-back to
controlling. What actually makes them effective, he says, is that they all do these seven things:

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Leadership institute founder Lorraine Monroe never launches a new
undertaking without providing her staff with these vital pieces of
information to influence and guide them:

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