Executive Leadership

Brush up business-theory basics—from Gantt Charts to Maslow’s Hierarchy.

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Encourage learning and build creativity by explaining the results you’re looking for.

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Protect your laptop at the airport.

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Fear of sexual-harassment suits have forced many American leaders to stop touching people. Yet,
some top executives, including Jack Welch, still include a pat on the
shoulder or a warmer-than-usual handshake among their leadership tools. Here’s how to use the power of touch:

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Stay on top of your responsibilities with this technique from Donald Trump:

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George Washington stood first in the hearts of his countrymen for many reasons. One of them: He treated people right. By the time he was
16, he had copied out the Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation. Here’s a sampling from the book, a code of 110 rules, that Washington often displayed:

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When Pennsbury High School junior class President Bob Costa was asked
to take on a mission—persuade local-but-soon-to-be-national pop star
John Mayer to play the 2003 Pennsbury High junior prom—he agreed.

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The following novels are old, corny and sexist. But they were the most
popular “get ahead” books of their day because they taught effective
lessons about success.

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Building and leading an effective team require choreographing a complex dance among people, roles and ideas. Follow these four steps:

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Carole Howe’s strengths lie in her imaginative concepts:
tickle-your-fancy ideas that brought shops like Bow Wow Meow, Field
& Stream and Fly Babies into airport concourses. But Howe, founder and president of the specialty retail group that
operates Creative Kidstuff, The Paradies Shops and other successful
airport retail franchises, admits that she isn’t much of a planner.

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